Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By PaulB
#1733656
This may have been discussed before, in which case I apologise.

There are loads of pilots operating predominantly in the UK on FAA licences... Actually, are there loads or is the number of pilots operating predominantly on FAA licences in the UK/Europe actually quite small?

There are also lots (see question above) of N reg aircraft based here.

Would it be as easy to operate a G reg wholly in the US on an EASA licence as it is to operate an N reg here?

Also, while I was typing I wondered if the N reg fleet (and their associated pilots) is spread through EASA land or mainly here in the UK?


As ever, just curious.
#1733657
PaulB wrote:Would it be as easy to operate a G reg wholly in the US on an EASA licence as it is to operate an N reg here?


Im trying to think of a reason why you would ever want to do this....
#1733664
skydriller wrote:
PaulB wrote:Would it be as easy to operate a G reg wholly in the US on an EASA licence as it is to operate an N reg here?


Im trying to think of a reason why you would ever want to do this....


.. local touring, or being temporarily based there ?

ISTR that Peter Masefield, the first Civil Air Attache at the Embassy in Wahington after WW2, operated a G- reg Proctor in the US during his 3-year tour. He flew it extensively around the US, both visiting US aircraft enterprises and 'showing the flag'.

These days, there might be a Type with a full EASA CofA (or EASA-approved Mods/'STC's) with no FAA equivalent. Under ICAO rules, it could not be excluded from FAA-controlled airspace (AIUI) if kept on an EASA Reg and flown on an EASA PPL; providing it was eventually re-exported, or intended to be. This may mirror the situation with many N- Reg FAA Certified Types/STCs in EASA-land.
Last edited by kanga on Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
#1733686
Would that even apply to a US citizen wanting to fly (say a G reg on an EASA UK licence)?

(No I don't know why anyone wants to do that either...)

What about a UK citizen operating an N reg on an FAA license?
#1733690
Several forumites have flown both G reg and N reg aircraft to & from Oshkosh - and spent weeks touring around the US.

Entering & leaving the US in a European based GA aircraft, whether G or N reg, is quite complex - and requires pre-booking - and an appointment to meet a US Customs official at a designated airport.
All persons on board have to have a B1/B2 visa (the ESTA or other visa waiver programmes are only applicable if arriving on a scheduled airline or charter aircraft.

If an N reg aircraft - you can just fly around the US - without restrictions or further procedure.
If a G reg - you then (legally) have to notify the FAA and request permission - and file a flight plan for each and every flight you make in the US.

I do know people who have ignored that rule and got away with it.
However, speaking personally, and knowing the American sensitivities about aviation security - I wouldn't want to do this.
#1733719
PaulB wrote:Would it be as easy to operate a G reg wholly in the US on an EASA licence .


Paul , are you on drugs mate ?... :D

This has to be the most imaginitive , hypothetical question of the week .

I'd love to be a fly on the wall when ' EASA Johnny' wanders into Chuck the local A&P's shop and asks Chuck , "will you be my CAMO"... :D

,,,,,,,,,,,," y'ain't one of them cross-dressin' folks are ya boy " ?.............. :pale:
Colonel Panic liked this
#1733772
Chris Martyr wrote:
PaulB wrote:Would it be as easy to operate a G reg wholly in the US on an EASA licence .


Paul , are you on drugs mate ?... :D


I was just wondering whether the ease of operating an N reg here was reciprocated “over there”. The answer would appear to be “no not at all”

The other part of the question was whether there are significant fleets of N reg aircraft operating from other EASA countries.
#1733777
The other part of the question was whether there are significant fleets of N reg aircraft operating from other EASA countries.


Yup, quite a few and inline with national fleet sizes I'd guess. Perhaps even more prevalent amongst the more expensive GA aircraft (inc pistons, turbines and jets).

Ian
PaulB, Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1733809
Flyingfemme wrote:Since 9/11 it’s all got much more complicated. Every flight has to be “approved” by the authorities - not difficult in itself but it precludes spur of the moment excursions.

I'd be interested if you could quote the specific source of this.

Notam FDC 6/4255 only applies to aircraft from 'special interest' countries and there is nothing in the AIP Gen 1.2 other than a requirement to check Notams.

I applied for a special flight authorisation to fly an amateur built aircraft to the US and was bounced from pillar to post by the FSDOs before being completely ignored. When I arrived at Bangor for CBP clearance they checked my paperwork and told me I was free to continue and 'Welcome to the USA'.
:wink: Good enough for me!

Keeping a foreign aircraft in the US long term would obviously raise the issue of getting approved maintenance. I'm not sure how that would work out.
#1733821
The requirements and procedures seem to change quite regularly and I admit we haven’t done it for a while. But I wouldn’t attempt anything without thoroughly checking the requirements and procedures. We once had an N reg ferry arrive using an ICAO call sign belonging to a UK organisation.........it was met by many men in black suits with guns because they didn’t understand the callsign/registration thing and found no permission for a foreign aircraft. We don’t do that any more. It inconveniences Nav Canada because they don’t know who to bill for nav charges but we can live without an armed “welcome” party.
Flyin'Dutch' liked this