Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
Forum rules: Please keep it polite!
#1645960
I held a UK PPL(A) back in the 1980's, last certificate of experience expired in 1988 I think. I have both Tailwheel and glider towing experience in my logbook and I also had a non-expiring FRTOL associated with the licence

I now hold an LAPL(S), with FRTOL and Spoken English certificate in that licence, and I have a valid LAPL medical

So I think I understand I can re-validate the old PPL(A) by doing sufficient flying to pass a proficiency/renewal flight. AIUI there is no requirement to re-take any written exams? What I'm not sure is what licence I end up with - is it an NPPL, or do I then have to renew my UK PPL(A) and then transfer it to an EASA licence? Obviously makes more sense to have an LAPL(A) rather than EASA PPL, as it keeps the same medical requirements I guess.

So some questions:

    Can anyone point me at the steps I need to take to get from where I am today to an LAPL(A)?
    Will my old taildragger and glider towing experience count for anything or do I have to get those ratings again?
    Is this the most cost-effective way to do it? I understand there is another route which involves getting TMG on my LAPL(S), then doing some solo TMG flying followed by differences training for SEP. However I only know one place which does TMG on a LALP(S).
    Is this going to get more difficult once the current UK exemptions end (and do we have a timescale for that)?
#1645965
To get you UK PPL up and running you need to do training as required and pass a flight test. The examiner can then sign the ratings page and the licence is current again. No written tests to pass and you would be legal to fly taildraggers straight away.

I don't know about glider towing

Medical wise a medical declaration would be sufficient.

Also the old UK PPL includes an SLMG rating which can be activated by a test. With no CAA involvement at all.

You be good to go till at least April next year and if you ever wanted an EASA PPL it's just a paperwork excercise to get one.

I have to say I think reactivating an old UK PPL is very easy and as it doesn't involve the CAA it's quick and cheap.
mick w, ls8pilot liked this
#1645980
@ls8pilot Sometime 2004-2008 a new format licence will have been sent to you at the last address they knew about - do you have those pages? They will have the printing date in tiny print in each footer. Check this says sep(land) in section xii.
#1645984
To get you UK PPL up and running you need to do training as required and pass a flight test. The examiner can then sign the ratings page and the licence is current again


There would be no such thing as a ratings page in a 1980s U.K. licence. It would either be a group A/B licence etc. So a new physical licence document would be required
#1646015
Irv Lee wrote:@ls8pilot Sometime 2004-2008 a new format licence will have been sent to you at the last address they knew about - do you have those pages? They will have the printing date in tiny print in each footer. Check this says sep(land) in section xii.


Ah..., thanks for the info. The address on the licence is rather out of date, so sounds like first step is to contact the CAA with my current address and get a new format licence ?
#1646018
@ls8pilot well, I think if you did that, you would end up with a PPL with the right address but with the SEP rating that you want (Single Engine Piston) listed on the back as 'expired' - this would mean paying them again (£80+) just to move it to the front once you passed your renewal test. I think the best way (cheapest by eighty-odd pounds) is to combine all the paperwork as the test is passed.
ls8pilot liked this
#1646034
Logbook evidence of past glider towing can be used to include a sailplane tow rating when you apply for the LAPL(A). CAA guidance here. The reference to
Convert their UK issued licence to a Part FCL licence before 8 April 2018.
is simply wrong. Ignore it.

The reference to FCL 805(e):
(e) In order to exercise the privileges of the sailplane or banner towing ratings, the holder of the rating shall have completed a minimum of 5 tows during the last 24 months.
(f) When the pilot does not comply with the requirement in (e), before resuming the exercise of his/her privileges, the pilot shall complete the missing tows with or under the supervision of an instructor.


LAPL(S) with TMG privileges -> LAPL(A) with SEP privileges might be more cost effective for a beginner who is a quick learner, it will almost certainly be quicker and cheaper for you to 'renew' your SEP & convert to EASA at the same time.
ls8pilot liked this
#1713719
Irv Lee wrote:@ls8pilot well, I think if you did that, you would end up with a PPL with the right address but with the SEP rating that you want (Single Engine Piston) listed on the back as 'expired' - this would mean paying them again (£80+) just to move it to the front once you passed your renewal test. I think the best way (cheapest by eighty-odd pounds) is to combine all the paperwork as the test is passed.


Apologies for reviving an old thread, but thought I would just add a progress item. I've found that sending off the old "Brown" licence, with form SRG2156 and a certified copy of my Passport has produced a new format UK PPL with the correct address and other details at no cost. Although it's not clear on the CAA site it turns out this just counts as a change of address and so is free.

As I already had a LAP(S) and LAPL Medical the FRTOL and English Language proficiency carried over, and the licence shows I have expired SEP and TMG with currently blank revalidation tables as described by @Irv Lee

You can ignore the bit in SRG2156 which asks for copies of your revalidation entries (the old Brown licence doesn't have them).

Now the task for this autumn is to get the revalidation bits filled in!

PS: CAA response was within 2 weeks - pretty good!
Irv Lee, kanga, MJHANTS liked this
#1733754
MJHANTS wrote:Thanks for posting your progress. Am about to do the same with my licence issued in 1982! Did you send in your original licence or a certified copy? Am strangely attached to my piece of old brown card :D


Mark


I sent my old licence in - I had problems getting a certified copy so this seemed the easiest route, I think a copy will do but you need the correct certification.,