Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

Moderator: AndyR

By iaindings
#1613611
So I've got my 9th and final written exam booked for Monday, I'm just wondering if someone could let me know roughly what to expect in terms of format etc.

I'm fairly sure I'm ready for it - I've read the book, been doing **** practice tests - I'm comfortable with the wizz wheel for finding true tracks/GS, W/V, wind components, unit calculations etc etc. I've also done some actual navigation exercises, PLOGs for nav practice flights etc.

I understand that the exam is likely to consist of a real chart and PLOG to be completed - is that likely to be along the lines of "plan a flight from x to y, winds aloft are xxxx" and I have to complete the track, heading, magnetic heading, G/S, TAS, times etc?

The practice tests havent involved any of the more practical elements ofusing an actual chart and a PLOG (they just have questions like "for a track of 120 and TAS of 90kts, WV is 230/20, find the heading and G/S") so unsure what to expect and want to make sure I'm ready.

What should I plan to bring with me? I've been using fine tipped permanent markers on my chart/wizz wheel and nailpolish remover to get it off, should I bring that to the exam too?

Thanks for any pointers, not looking for any answers or examples, just ideas of what to expect
User avatar
By FlightDek
#1613650
From what I can remember here's a few pointers

1. RTFQ
2. RTFA
3. Watch out for unit conversions. Question might be in nm but correct answer in km
4. You get a partial plog, a chart and a route to complete the plog
5. Wind might vary between legs on the plog
6. I used chinagraph, ruler, protractor, whizwheel, calculator

I remember 1 question asking what a map symbol meant - the answer was at the bottom of the chart :lol:

Good luck :thumleft:
By iaindings
#1614139
Done!

God knows if I’ve passed, the only instructor who marks them isnt in till Sunday :(

It was tricky but fine, a few times I ended up with an answer between 2 options but after double checking and reworking it always landed on a solid answer. Once was using the minus side of the temp scale when doing tas-GS and the other was a question only focussed on GS, forgot to correct for drift which obviously affects the GS result too.

Interestingly, no PLOG or chart. Every question was standalone and didn’t follow from the ones before. One question had a PLOG shown but in reality it was “for this track, tas, altitude, temp and wv calculate gs and heading”

Hopefully it’s a pass but it wasn’t as daunting as I thought
User avatar
By Irv Lee
#1614793
Fanatastic.... I wonder how many do that (not all that many I guess)
iaindings wrote:evidently i was worrying about nothing

I suspect you were actually worrying about "nothing to 74%" inclusive
By TopCat
#1614863
iaindings wrote:evidently i was worrying about nothing - got 100%!

Well done!

On a more curmudgeonly note, I've always thought the pass mark is too low for all the PPL and IMC exams.

Look at it this way, if someone really hasn't put in the effort to know more than three quarters of the material, what does that say about aptitude, attention to detail, attitude, ability to concentrate, etc etc? You know, those things that pilots are supposed to be able to do!

Are they going to read only three quarters of the NOTAMs? Three quarters of the TAFs and METARs?

Doubtless there are counter-examples of people that only just scraped through and still went on to be a flying legend, but the reality is that the questions are really not difficult at all.

Either make the pass mark higher, or deduct marks for wrong answers, I say!
By iaindings
#1615022
I’m inclined to agree TopCat

For someone with no prior knowledge and a full time job, they did appear quite daunting at first but it’s pretty apparent they aren’t doing a great job of testing the stuff you need to know in the real world.

I think the biggest flaw is there’s simply not enough questions. The pass mark only represents 2 or 3 wrong answers, 12 or 16 multiple choice questions can’t give an accurate picture of someone’s ability. I personally found that I was finished well under the time allowed - even in Nav I was out in about 20 minutes. Make it 30 questions and 1 hour and they’d probably get a better picture
By huseyydemm
#1617292
How was the navi?
I dont understad this, like what to expect, because ALL in the exam practices are the same questions than in the real exam... or very very similar.... when you are ready with the book quizzes, use training apps...
http://pilotapplications.com/ppl-trainer-apps/


you can choose from many.

And teh most important part is to understand a topic, than its not a problem when a brand new question or task pops up :) ;)
User avatar
By Irv Lee
#1617305
iaindings wrote:I think the biggest flaw is there’s simply not enough questions. The pass mark only represents 2 or 3 wrong answers, 12 or 16 multiple choice questions can’t give an accurate picture of someone’s ability. .... Make it 30 questions and 1 hour and they’d probably get a better picture

EASA mandated fewer questions over all and i think AOPA got narked when the CAA somehow forgot to comply fast enough, so they were eventually forced to cut down. I think it is harder to pass Comms, now 12 questions, used to be 30.
In the old caa commercial exams there was penalty marking... If you answered and got it wrong you lost a mark, but admit you didn't know by not answering and you got zero. More honest in a way.