Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By Old Pilot
#937096
Gerard Clarke wrote:I infer from the report, Pete, that there was little information available about the pilot's physiology at the time of death. No toxicology screening was carried out during the post mortem. It may have been a cursory job on the grounds of "not very important" and/or it was a busy week for people falling into combine harvesters (this is Norfolk, remember).


Jokes aside Gerard it appears strange that toxicology screening was not carried out.
However I assume if he had been under the effects of drugs it would have shown up in the post mortem.
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By Old Pilot
#937097
Gerard Clarke wrote:I infer from the report, Pete, that there was little information available about the pilot's physiology at the time of death. No toxicology screening was carried out during the post mortem. It may have been a cursory job on the grounds of "not very important" and/or it was a busy week for people falling into combine harvesters (this is Norfolk, remember).


Jokes aside Gerard it appears strange that toxicology screening was not carried out.
However I assume if he had been under the effects of drugs it would have shown up in the post mortem.
By hatzflyer
#937104
WHOA . ...I was in the clubhouse .He WAS advised not to fly and he WAS offerred help.
He made a bit of a recovery and insisted on flying because he said the plane HAD to go to Old Buck .
Short of physically restraing him and risking being arrested for assult there wasn't much anyone could do.
So please don't be second guessing on public forums.
We all feel bad enough about this buisness.
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By Old Pilot
#937109
I was not having a go at anyone Hatz. I'm sure it is like trying to stop someone who has had too much to drink driving home.
This incident apart there will always be a few who for one reason or another should not be flying.

It was fortunate he took out no one on the ground.
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By Old Pilot
#979181
Inquest verdict now published.
This from the Eastern Daily Press in Norwich

Pilot who crashed his plane near Old Buckenham airfield, near Attleborough, not fit to be flying, inquest told
By DAVID BALE

A pilot whose light aircraft crashed and burst into flames near a south Norfolk airfield was physically and mentally unfit to fly on the day of his fatal accident, an inquest heard.
Pavel Sedlacek, 66, died from multiple injuries after his aircraft crashed nose-down into a field at Puddleduck Farm on his way to Old Buckenham Airfield on May 9 last year where maintenance work on his Mooney M20B aircraft was scheduled to take place.
The Czech Republic national, who lived in Dornbirn, Austria, left Biberach Airport, in southern Germany, in the early afternoon, on May 9. After requesting airfield details from Old Buckenham, he landed unexpectedly at Tibenham Airfield, at about 5.30pm, where he was seen to be in a “disturbed” state.
David Cross told the inquest that he was tending his sheep at a nearby farm, at about 6pm, when he saw the aircraft flying overhead, seconds before it crashed.
He said: “It was approaching very low. It went over the farmyard and the pilot went to throttle the engine up, then the plane stalled. It disappeared behind trees and then I saw a puff of smoke.”
Mr Cross rushed to the scene but the plane had burst into flames and Mr Sedlacek was pronounced dead at the scene.
Philip Morgan, ground manager at Tibenham airfield, said Mr Sedlacek landed the plane on the wrong runway and came in very fast, bouncing about five times. He said: “When he got out the plane he was very hot and sweaty. He said the brakes did not appear to be working and he was also talking about family problems. He appeared to be in a disturbed state, and we advised him not to fly on to Old Buckenham airfield, but we could not stop him.”
John McMillan, a senior inspector with the Air Accidents Investigation Branch, said the plane had no technical defects. But his fellow inspector Kenneth Fairbank said that, judging by Mr Sedlacek’s airmanship on the day and reports of his flying skills from Germany, it was doubtful that he was in a fit state to be flying an aircraft on that day.
Recording a verdict of accidental death at yesterday’s Norwich inquest, Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said: “Clearly from 
the expert evidence given, his flying ability and standard of airmanship appear to have been questionable.

“We do not know what he was intending, but all evidence points towards him not being fit to be flying on that day, whether through competence, or more likely, through his psychological state of mind.”
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By Old Pilot
#979267
Pete L wrote:Could be as simple as dehydration. Although I have no idea if that would be picked up on a postmortem or not.

Interesting thought. Would dehydration cause those symptons?
By 15m unflapped
#979272
From the report:

He was sweating profusely, with sweat-soaked clothing.


Can one be in that state and also dehydrated?
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By mmcp42
#979282
I should have thought that sweating profusely was a good way to lose lots of fluid - leading to eventual dehydration
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By PeteSpencer
#979322
There are many types of post mortem:

IIRC he had a 'limited' post mortem: In my day this would have meant examining the heart/coronary vessels and cracking the skull to have a look at the brain, but not opening the abdomen to inspect the bowel contents.............

Sweating profusely occurs in coke overdoses as does extreme agitation and irrationality/confusion I wonder if anyone commented on the size of his pupils or saw them at Tibenham. Hatz?

Peter
By 15m unflapped
#979327
mmcp42 wrote:I should have thought that sweating profusely was a good way to lose lots of fluid - leading to eventual dehydration


Indeed it does, but can one be 'sweating profusely' and at the same time 'dehydrated'? Assuming no drugs that is.
By FlyingShack
#979339
and we advised him not to fly on to Old Buckenham airfield, but we could not stop him


I've said this before .... shouldn't we be more proactive in stopping people flying who show signs of being unfit to fly?

i.e. There should be a mechanism - duty CFI or airport authority.
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By GrahamB
#979352
FlyingShack wrote:
and we advised him not to fly on to Old Buckenham airfield, but we could not stop him


I've said this before .... shouldn't we be more proactive in stopping people flying who show signs of being unfit to fly?

i.e. There should be a mechanism - duty CFI or airport authority.


I disagree entirely.

We suffer from too much over-regulation in our chosen pastime as it is. I believe we have a duty to try and prevent one another from doing stupid things, but regulation? No. (The degree of effort we make might also vary according to the circumstances and perceived threat).

How would you react if a busy-body car-park attendant had the law on his side in stopping you from leaving a car park because you appeared, in his opinion, too angry to drive safely because he saw you arguing vehemently with your wife, for example.

It is also impractical at smaller fields where there may not be a 'CFI' (if such a thing legally exists) or the 'Authority' may not be present.

Hatz - you have my sympathies. You must feel dreadful that you tried, but the worst happened anyway.
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By Old Pilot
#979573
What puzzles me is that he carried out a long flight to the UK and only got in to trouble at the end.

If he had any sort of mental problems then I'm sure they would have been recognised when he took his annual medical.
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By Lowtimer
#979580
15m unflapped wrote:
mmcp42 wrote:I should have thought that sweating profusely was a good way to lose lots of fluid - leading to eventual dehydration


Indeed it does, but can one be 'sweating profusely' and at the same time 'dehydrated'? Assuming no drugs that is.


From personal experience "yes, definitely", certainly dehydrated to the fairly modest degree at which ability to concentrate and mental processing performance start to fall away. Other people may be more robust than me, of course.