Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
By Maxthelion
#1559617
I know I sound like a bit of a killjoy, but as a tinittus sufferer, I wouldn't take a dog flying in anything but the quietist of aircraft and with the addition of doggy style(!) ear defenders. Their ears are much more sensitive than ours and as such would be much easier to induce tinittus in. It's not something I would do to my best friend for the sake of getting to fly together.
By TLRippon
#1559630
I picked up my 8 week old Whippet from the breeder last December in the aircraft. Flew from Headcorn to Sywell in 45mins against a close to three hour road trip. His longest trip so far was in May when we flew Sywell-Shoreham-White Waltham without landing as Shoreham was socked in with a vary low base. 1.6 hours and no accidents. He prefers to sit on the Wife's lap rather than be in the hold especially when the children are in the aircraft too. You never hear a cheap out of him and he usually looks out the window for ten minutes then goes to sleep.

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By yappmeister
#1559644
I fly with the dog when needed, one of the reasons I justified the expenditure on a licence was weekends away. Recently did a weekend away to the Scilly Isles that worked rather well.

Dog is usually a bit nervous in the car but absolutely fine in the plane. Once on board and over the excitement she just sleeps.

The Mutt Muffs work well - not sure at what decibels you actually need to worry about damage to their hearing but they seem to help with the sleeping...

J

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By stodge
#1559683
Great stories everyone! Certainly lots here to think about for a possible article in which case I will probably be pm'ing you all!).

Just some quick questions if anybody has the time to respond...?

1. Despite the reference to cats in the thread is there anyone out there who actually takes their cat in their plane?

2. Any other key considerations/tips for those thinking of taking your pet flying? (eg does the dog go front or back? And why?)

3. Has anyone had any issues/problems/funny stories when taking their pets flying?

4. Finally does anyone reading this take more than one pet up?

Love to know - and many thanks again!
By Mr Dinos
#1559685
As a rule I'd say dog goes in the back so as to not interfere with the controls.

Only taken ours once so far but noticed some occasional odd smells. I thought I was flying near a waste disposal site but when we landed my wife duly informed me that the dog was a bit windy
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By fattony
#1559686
stickandrudderman wrote:I do it all the time. I've never used any doggy muffs and the dogs have not suffered.

But how would you tell if they had suffered? Have you had their hearing tested?

My take on it is that if I won't fly without hearing protection then nor should my dog, whose hearing is far more sensitive than mine. I don't consider it fair to subject her to potentially damaging noise levels when I wouldn't subject myself to the same without protection.
By David Viewing
#1559694
Apologies for the thread drift but there is some relevance:

My old dog Barney never went in the plane but did experience a hot air balloon landing in our pony paddock, which terrified him for life. Ever after, if we saw a balloon, he'd go berserk trying to get at it. This included driving in the Land Rover, when he'd climb on the steering wheel spokes if the balloon was on that side. A bit awkward on a dual carriageway, let alone in a PA-28!

I suggest keeping the dog in the back!
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By flybymike
#1559705
Mr Dinos wrote:As a rule I'd say dog goes in the back so as to not interfere with the controls.

Only taken ours once so far but noticed some occasional odd smells. I thought I was flying near a waste disposal site but when we landed my wife duly informed me that the dog was a bit windy


Tut tut.....no way to talk about the wife.
By Mr Dinos
#1559713
flybymike wrote:
Mr Dinos wrote:As a rule I'd say dog goes in the back so as to not interfere with the controls.

Only taken ours once so far but noticed some occasional odd smells. I thought I was flying near a waste disposal site but when we landed my wife duly informed me that the dog was a bit windy


Tut tut.....no way to talk about the wife.


:lol: :lol: :lol:
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By kanga
#1559863
ISTR hearing that part of the original spec for the Beaver, after the dHC folk had consulted lots of bush operators about the shortcomings of various prewar designs, was

'when taildown on wheels or skis, or level on floats, the (lower) lip of the main door should be close enough to the ground/dock that a fully grown husky can jump in without needing to be lifted'

.. and I've seen it done :thumright:

[and, obviously, the float struts should be strong enough that a standard komatik (or canoe) can be strapped to them and safely flown :) ]

The Beaver was so 'right first time' that the production version differed from the prototype only by the addition of an extra rear window. The prototype, after test flying, went on to >40 years' commercial service unmodified. It is now in the (excellent) Museum at Rockcliffe in Ottawa.