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#1821821
Hi,

Bloggs has a UK issued EASA PPL(A) with SEP and an LAPL medical. Bloggs wants to fly a G- registered EASA aircraft in an EASA country. Can he?

Most of the guidance I can see talks about what happens post-Brexit if Bloggs has an LAPL license...answer is clear, he can't because the LAPL is not an ICAO license. Okay, but Bloggs has a PPL license with an LAPL medical and when you look on the LAPL medical front cover it says 'Issued in accordance with Part-Med. This medical certificate complies with ICAO standards, except the LAPL certificate.'

Surely the criteria (to fly abroad in a G- registered aircraft) is essentially [ICAO compliant] license, rating and medical?

Does the fact that the LAPL complies with ICAO standards (as printed on the medical) mean that this is an ICAO medical, or does the fact that Bloggs have an LAPL medical mean that his PPL is effectively an LAPL?

Can anyone help answer the question and/or point me in the direction of any material that makes it clear? Appreciate any help/info.

Cheers,
100poundburger liked this
#1821949
The wording is a bit odd, it means that the Certificate format complies with ICAO standards but the LAPL medical doesn't.

The only ICAO compliant combo is PPL with Class 1 or 2 medical.

Anything else requires agreement from each individual state you want to fly to or in....
#1821982
Bloggs has a UK issued EASA PPL(A) with SEP and an LAPL medical. Bloggs wants to fly a G- registered EASA aircraft in an EASA country. Can he?


No he may not. Because a UK CAA issued Part-FCL PPL, which does not include a valid Class 2 medical certificate, does not comply with the requirements of Article 59 of Regulation 2018/1139.

See https://info.caa.co.uk/uk-eu-transition/private-pilots/ and scroll down to the LAPL section.