Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
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By PaulB
#1759452
Highland Park wrote:Please forgive me for being really thick; I sometimes struggle to interpret these notices because of the way they are written.

Does this include my EASA PPL which ordinarily I was due to revalidate by experience (with the instructor hour) on or before 30 June this year, or are the instructions for this still to be issued?


I’m sort of in the same position.... in my case it’s highly unlikely that I’ll get the 12 hours in before my SEP expires. I therefore have 2 options (I think):

1. Let it expire and do appropriate training with a DTO/ATO followed by a mini skills test with an examiner.

2. Jump through the hoops of this extension to extend my SEP until mid November by which time I’ll have the hours. If I don’t then it’s back to option 1.
#1759535
@Highland Park remember you do not have an easa ppl that expires, you have an easa class rating that expires, so yes this exemption about class ratings (and other things) applies to you.
Break Break
Anyone want to make an sep briefing video to standardise what everyone gets? (*). Watch that whilst in contact with suitable FI or examiner so you can ask questions, & at end, issue extension certificate
Break Break
Can we assume exemption soon for nppl ratings?

(* there should be a standard caa "current hot topics" one anyway in normal times so that pilots are supposed to watch prior to reval just so all are aware of current issues)
Last edited by Irv Lee on Wed Apr 08, 2020 10:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
rdfb liked this
#1759539
Can we assume exemption soon for nppl ratings?


No. NPPLs issued on or before 7 Apr 2018 must be converted to LAPL(A) if the holder wishes to fly EASA aircraft. Otherwise they will be restricted to non-EASA aircraft only.

NPPLs issued after 7 Apr 2018 cannot be converted directly to LAPLs. The holder must complete the training requirements of FCL.110.A (including any available credit) before applying for a LAPL.
By PaulB
#1759542
nickwilcock wrote:
Can we assume exemption soon for nppl ratings?


No. NPPLs issued on or before 7 Apr 2018 must be converted to LAPL(A) if the holder wishes to fly EASA aircraft. Otherwise they will be restricted to non-EASA aircraft only.

NPPLs issued after 7 Apr 2018 cannot be converted directly to LAPLs. The holder must complete the training requirements of FCL.110.A (including any available credit) before applying for a LAPL.


Ouch!
User avatar
By Irv Lee
#1759550
nickwilcock wrote:
Can we assume exemption soon for nppl ratings?


No. NPPLs issued on or before 7 Apr 2018 must be converted to LAPL(A) if the holder wishes to fly EASA aircraft. Otherwise they will be restricted to non-EASA aircraft only.

I know, And please explain why the "No" in your answer - does that mean they don't deserve a similar exemption for nppl ratings as I asked?
#1759579
@nickwilcock Nick you have sent the following statement out to AOPA members.

2.3 When the PMD exemption period is revoked, pilot wishing to exercise the privileges of a Part-FCL licence, whether on EASA or non-EASA aircraft, will need to hold a Part-MED medical certificate.


Have the CAA formally stated that afterNovember, a PMD may not be used with an EASA licence to fly any type of aeroplane, and that in order to fly annex 1 only, those who do not already hold any flavour of national licence, will be required to obtain one?
#1759594
Yes, it's in the final sentence of the explanatory note on p3 of ORS4 No.1370:
Upon expiry of this exemption, GA pilots with UK-issued Part FCL LAPL and PPLs will be required to hold a medical certificate.


I queried whether this applied to both EASA and non-EASA aircraft flown on a Part-FCL licence and the CAA confirmed that it does.

A PMD is not a medical certificate.
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User avatar
By Dave W
#1759597
The LAA have supplied a pithy summary:
LAA wrote:Dear LAA Member

ORS 1374 issued by the CAA now extends all Class 2 medical certificates, and a number of class ratings, until 22nd November 2020. So no declaration is now required if you have a Class 2 aviation medical.

ORS 1374 also extends all EASA license and rating revalidations until 22nd November, subject to instructor or examiner non-flying endorsement. This applies to EASA Part-FCL PPLs and LAPLs. A further CAA announcement is expected shortly offering similar extensions to UK PPL and NPPL holders.

See: http://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/1374.pdf

Regards

Light Aircraft Association
#1759599
@nickwilcock
Ok so we’ll all need a national licence if we want to continue to fly using a PMD then.
Will also make annex 1 aircraft and shares quite valuable.

Should be quite a flurry of applications. Are both NPPLs and UK CAA PPL s still available?
#1759616
Dave W wrote:The LAA have supplied a pithy summary:
LAA wrote:A further CAA announcement is expected shortly offering similar extensions to UK PPL and NPPL holders.

Thanks, that answers my question rather than a different question
flybymike, Dave W liked this
#1759641
So its hard to keep track of all of this.
If fully Part-FCL, with any expirations between 16th March 2020 and 31st October 2020, those expirations are generally now 22nd November 2020 (depending on the expiration, you'll need to do a briefing / do some paperwork) (PPL / LAPL OSR 1374 CPL etc OSR1354)
If Part-FCL with a personal medical declaration (PMD) before 8th April instead of a medical certificate, you can operate EASA aircraft till 8th November (with essentially LAPL privileges (ORS 1370)

If you have a non-Part FCL licence, there will be an announcement soon.

Flying non-EASA aircraft, with a Part-FCL licence and PMD remains as is as this doesn't require an exemption?
TheLodger liked this
#1759645
nickwilcock wrote:Yes, it's in the final sentence of the explanatory note on p3 of ORS4 No.1370:
Upon expiry of this exemption, GA pilots with UK-issued Part FCL LAPL and PPLs will be required to hold a medical certificate.


I queried whether this applied to both EASA and non-EASA aircraft flown on a Part-FCL licence and the CAA confirmed that it does.

A PMD is not a medical certificate.

This is WRONG.
UK law says that a medical declaration is valid with a Part-FCL licence for non-easa aircraft.
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016 ... e/150/made
nothing to do with any exceptions.
Can I suggest you re-clarify?
#1759689
1. I received the following from the CAA:
The UK’s medical declaration arrangements originate from National legislation in the ANO. In this context, Medical declaration is not recognised under EU legislation, hence the publication of a series of UK exemptions relating to Med Dec over the last c.3 years. The unintended and secondary effect of the long-term SubPart-B derogation was EU legislation enabled the use of National licences to operate EASA aircraft and in the UK a National licence holder could also use medical declaration. Bringing these 2 points together meant a UK National pilot licence holder could operate an EASA aircraft with a Med Dec in the UK.

As the SubPart B derogation ends on 8 April, a pilot previously operating on an National licence needs a Part-FCL licence instead. As the EU legislation does not recognise Med Dec in this context the overriding requirement becomes the requirement to hold a Part-FCL licence and a Med certificate will be required if operating an EASA or Non EASA aircraft if the holder is operating under their Part-FCL licence privileges.

The option to hold a National licence to operate Annex 1 aircraft on a Med Dec remains unchanged.


Later I was also advised:
Whilst we understand the challenge this may cause for GA it is the legal reality.
In general terms when 1370 expires for (A) and (H) pilots with Part-FCL licences they will need an (EU) Med Certificate to operate an EASA or non-EASA aircraft, whilst a National pilot licence holder can continue with a med declaration to operate non EASA aircraft only.


I am unaware of the source or accuracy of the LAA's information. However, mine comes from the very people who have been negotiating the alleviations with the DfT.

However, there is now some good news for non-EASA UK PPL and NPPL holders; I've just been on the phone (15:00 BST) to the CAA and they state that validity extensions for current non-EASA licences will now be released as soon as can be achieved. These will only be for flying non-EASA aircraft though.

My point regarding conversion of NPPLs issued after 7th April remains.