Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
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By TLRippon
#1751292
Because setting up an entire training system; oversight and regulation, alongside the migration of all EASA registered training aircraft to the CAA and the agreement to fly NPPL sub icao licences from a non EU state to the EU and internally within.
I’m not holding my breath.
We inconveniently also have to earn a living while all this is happening.
Tell me whether I should risk starting a CPL TK with 13 exams with only nine months to finish before the exams become invalid?
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By 4535jacks
#1751300
TLRippon wrote:Because setting up an entire training system; oversight and regulation, alongside the migration of all EASA registered training aircraft to the CAA and the agreement to fly NPPL sub icao licences from a non EU state to the EU and internally within.
I’m not holding my breath.
We inconveniently also have to earn a living while all this is happening.
Tell me whether I should risk starting a CPL TK with 13 exams with only nine months to finish before the exams become invalid?


Do 14 exams instead and do them through AustroControl using one of the 3 UK exam centres. You will have EASA TK passes, which the CAA have agreed to recoginse until 31 Dec 2022.

This is what I am doing. I may even SOLI to IAA and get an EASA CPL+MEIR and then if required transfer back to the UK if my future employer wants it (I am only interested in UK-based jobs). The CAA has confirmed they will recognise non-UK EASA licences for conversion to a UK licence with no additional testing/training until 31 Dec 2022.

At the moment it looks like the safety bet is to hold an EASA licence from 31 Dec 20 as it will provide the opportunity to work in both the UK and EU and should be easily converted to a UK CPL.
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By TLRippon
#1751370
Not an option for someone who retired in their 50’s and does some instruction a few days a week, doesn’t want an airline job and probably wouldn’t be able to keep up a class 1 medical for long anyway.
Also a sole owner of an EASA registered and maintained aircraft based in the UK a GA Pilot, if you will. Why on earth would I do with an Austrocontrol licence with a post Brexit CAA G Reg aircraft?
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By ShadowPilot
#1751578
Does any of the LAPL flying and exams count towards getting a PPL(A) or is it a start from scratch?
And are there any ICAO recognised recreational licences for those of us that just enjoy balmy days of VFR flying?
By whatsausername
#1751600
ShadowPilot wrote:Does any of the LAPL flying and exams count towards getting a PPL(A) or is it a start from scratch?
And are there any ICAO recognised recreational licences for those of us that just enjoy balmy days of VFR flying?


There's a conversion route defined in the Part-FCL document. From memory, it's 15 hours total time, including 10 hours of instruction, including a solo XC of at least 150nm, then a GST. No theory tests. You also need a class 2 medical. It's an expensive ball ache
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By TLRippon
#1751610
It’s unusual for anyone to apply for a LAPL to PPL conversion before completing at least five hours of flying, so it’s often just 6 hours dual instruction and 4 hours supervised solo including the cross country before the skills test.
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By 4535jacks
#1751668
TLRippon wrote:Not an option for someone who retired in their 50’s and does some instruction a few days a week, doesn’t want an airline job and probably wouldn’t be able to keep up a class 1 medical for long anyway.
Also a sole owner of an EASA registered and maintained aircraft based in the UK a GA Pilot, if you will. Why on earth would I do with an Austrocontrol licence with a post Brexit CAA G Reg aircraft?



You don't need to get an AustroControl licence! What I am saying is that you can do TK exams with Austro and the CAA have said they will accept them for at least two years. I was presenting a solution to your earlier TK in 9 months comment.
By whatsausername
#1751680
What I am wondering about is whether and for how long the CAA will accept foreign EASA licenses (LAPL in particular) to fly G-reg aircraft. If that ends, then whether a foreign LAPL will be considered valid for G-reg aircraft outside the UK.
By ak7274
#1751800
If EASA don't accept UK licences for EASA aircraft, why would CAA accept non ICAO licences on G reg?
We need to remember a LAPL is not an ICAO recognised Licence, just as a NPPL is not ICAO recognised. In effect they are both National licences. It would be sensible if both EASA and CAA recognised and mutually accepted them.
The LAPL was based very closely on the NPPL and indeed requires only a 30 hr minimum training as opposed to 32 hrs for the NPPL.
Will both sides cut off their nose to spite their face? Probably
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By TLRippon
#1751858
4535jacks wrote:
TLRippon wrote:Not an option for someone who retired in their 50’s and does some instruction a few days a week, doesn’t want an airline job and probably wouldn’t be able to keep up a class 1 medical for long anyway.
Also a sole owner of an EASA registered and maintained aircraft based in the UK a GA Pilot, if you will. Why on earth would I do with an Austrocontrol licence with a post Brexit CAA G Reg aircraft?



You don't need to get an AustroControl licence! What I am saying is that you can do TK exams with Austro and the CAA have said they will accept them for at least two years. I was presenting a solution to your earlier TK in 9 months comment.

Isn’t that going to be a bit of a chocolate teapot though, if you need a CAA Licence to teach CAA PPL in the UK in nine months time.
By PhilS
#1752516
ak7274 wrote:If EASA don't accept UK licences for EASA aircraft, why would CAA accept non ICAO licences on G reg?
We need to remember a LAPL is not an ICAO recognised Licence, just as a NPPL is not ICAO recognised. In effect they are both National licences. It would be sensible if both EASA and CAA recognised and mutually accepted them.
The LAPL was based very closely on the NPPL and indeed requires only a 30 hr minimum training as opposed to 32 hrs for the NPPL.


I’ve been following this thread with interest - I obtained an NPPL (A) with microlight rating July ‘18 and have just recently completed the training and tests for SSEA. I was planning to start working towards LAPL but now wondering if I should just bypass that and go for a full PPL.

I’ve been hoping for a path from NPPL to LAPPL/PPL since summer 18 but that hasn’t materialised and it now looks like the timescales will be pushed further to the right with recent developments re CAA and EASA.

As a co-owner of a permit to fly aircraft I’m hoping to do much of my training in that if possible. It seems to defy logic that an NPPL SSEA pilot can fly solo to the training school in his or her own aircraft but is still required to complete a full PPL course from scratch. I’ve given up waiting for a sensible upgrade path that recognises this.
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