Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
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#1745502
Hi all,

I'm a glider pilot at recently became fully qualified and have applied to the BGA for a GPL (non-Part FCL) while I wait to see what happens with EASA in April now that the LAPL(S) is going out the door.

My club has Falke touring motorglider and the cost of getting an NPPL (SLMG) would be a fraction of the cost of an EASA PPL if I went down that route.

However I'm concerned about going down the NPPL route (I'd probably want SLMG and SSEA) and being 'trapped' on that license.

If I later decided I want a full PPL am I able to carry over the hours from an NPPL or do you effectively have to start over? I've read people discussing a 'bridge' that was available up until recently for converting but that's closed to new NPPL holders.

Thanks for any advice in advance...why must aviation licensing be so complicated!
#1745511
What will happen with EASA is that there will be a single sailplane licence, you get to choose which medical, ie LAPL or class 1 or class 2.

An NPPL SLMG can still be used to get TMG privileges added to your EASA sailplane licence. By the time that runs out (April 2021) we will have a clearer idea of which clubs will be doing training for EASA TMG privileges.

The NPPL SSEA will only be valid for homebuilt or ex-military aircraft, that ship has sailed. However, once you have TMG on your licence and then log an additional 21 TMG hours, there is a greatly reduced training & exam requirement to get an LAPL(A) with SEP privileges.

In summary, do the NPPL SLMG. Once Part Gliding has been published apply for an EASA sailplane licence with sailplane & TMG privileges, do 21 hours TMG & then you can do an LAPL(A) course with a minimum training requirement of only 3 hours + 3 exams + skill test.
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By JAFO
#1745549
low&slow wrote:The NPPL SSEA will only be valid for homebuilt or ex-military aircraft, that ship has sailed.


Sorry to jump in on this but which ship sailed to make this the case? There is still an exemption in place which, as far as I am aware, allows those with NPPLs and an SSEA rating to fly EASA aeroplanes.
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By Dodo
#1745551
low&slow wrote:
The NPPL SSEA will only be valid for homebuilt or ex-military aircraft


I think it will also remain valid for those Single engine aircraft of the appropriate size deemed not to be EASA aircraft, eg the Tripacer in which I have a share.
Last edited by Dodo on Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
#1745652
The SSEA -> LAPL(A) ship has sailed. I know there is currently an exemption but who can guarantee how long that will last?

Considering Caledonia91's starting point, the SSEA is a waste of time. SLMG, then TMG on sailplane licence & then LAPL(A) with TMG & SEP is the way to go.
#1745660
Dodo wrote:
low&slow wrote:
The NPPL SSEA will only be valid for homebuilt or ex-military aircraft


I think it will also remain valid for those Single engine aircraft of the appropriate size deemed not to be EASA aircraft, eg the Tripacer in which I have a share.


I think this would be fine for me, as I'm probably only going to be flying a kit-built Eurofox which isn't under EASA.
#1745662
low&slow wrote:The SSEA -> LAPL(A) ship has sailed. I know there is currently an exemption but who can guarantee how long that will last?

Considering Caledonia91's starting point, the SSEA is a waste of time. SLMG, then TMG on sailplane licence & then LAPL(A) with TMG & SEP is the way to go.


So NPPL SLMG, then I can add that TMG onto my EASA sailplane license (whatever it'll be called after April - I assume this is just a paper excercise?).

I guess I don't understand the training gap between going from NPPL SLMG to a LAPL(A) and the cost involved.
#1745665
Well that's new information.

If you're happy flying a homebuilt then SLMG & then SSEA will be easier & cheaper. NPPL licence allowances document here, see 2.1.1, basically valid SLMG + valid medical + satisfactory SSEA conversion training.

Once you have an NPPL SLMG you can use that to get TMG privileges (ie a TMG 'rating') on an EASA sailplane licence. The best bet is to hold off applying for an EASA licence until after you have gained as many BGA qualifications as you want & then apply for the EASA licence with as many privileges as you can. Getting a licence & then adding privileges later involves more paperwork & more cheques.

If you're happy flying a Eurofox & other annex I aeroplanes, leave it at that. Should you ever want to fly a DR400 or Pawnee or other EASA aircraft, a TMG 'rating' on your glider licence means a minimum of 3 hours training + 3 exams + skill test to get an LAPL(A) with SEP & TMG 'ratings'.
#1745666
@low&slow , I agree with you regarding the best route if @Caledonia91 should want a LAPL but if you're aware of the exemption allowing him to fly EASA types with an NPPL then why continue by saying:

low&slow wrote:Should you ever want to fly a DR400 or Pawnee or other EASA aircraft, a TMG 'rating' on your glider licence means a minimum of 3 hours training + 3 exams + skill test to get an LAPL(A) with SEP & TMG 'ratings'.
?

The OP could fly those aeroplanes today with an NPPL(SSEA), he can do that tomorrow, next week, next month and the month after that. None of us knows the future beyond that, I grant you, but why do you assume the worst and that the exemption won't be extended.
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