Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
Forum rules: Please keep it polite!
#1674483
Irv,

In your tweet you state that the exemption applies in UK airspace only, but the exemption suggests holders of a valid UK PPL would have LAPL privileges in a G-reg but does not mention geographical boundaries. I had assumed (possibly incorrectly) that the same was true of ORS4 1293.

Are you sure about the UK limitation?
#1674496
Well you may have read it as meaning ONLY U.K. but it doesnt say that, and I know others will read it same as you, but it is one of those "too complex in a tweet" when a simple message satisfies great majority of pilots needing to know. What I have written in the tweet is 100% true but I suspect not the whole truth. I did actually realise but told myself to KISS.
#1674518
To illustrate why I try keep it simple, in the past 2 hours I have had an RF and an ATO (I fly with neither so don't guess!) email to me saying they have read the ORS4 exemption several times and do not understand the official words, can I translate please? - each included what they guessed it meant and were basically correct but certainly were not going to allow (say) rentals til someone translated
#1674645
I recommend that Joe Pilot ONLY reads the first long sentence of the para headed "Reason" at the bottom of page 1, and then is passed a pint of beer with a note attached saying "Nppl and UK non-easa ppls are ANO licences", then told to drink half the beer and read the same sentence again, then say cheers and drink the rest of the beer. And then Joe Pilot will feel happier.
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#1674685
The exemption says ".....applies to any person holding an appropriate licence.....issued under article 152 of the Air Navigation Order 2016 .......". What the UK is prepared to accept is one thing; what any other nation or authority is prepared to accept is another. So I don't see this telling me anything about flight outside the UK.
#1674690
@Smaragd
I think the argument is that the icao level uk non-easa ppl-sep (meaning with class 2 or 1 medical) is given lapl privileges in easa aircraft which means EASA state access like a lapl would have until March 29th at least. Then depending on Brexit conditions, and EASA deals/membership, and maybe 101 other things, the combination might either continue as that or even change and become the normal icao flying abroad situation
#1674735
So gets kicked down the road again. what's it now 6 years?
So no need to change my old ppl(a) yet as lapl privleages suit me fine and logically it makes sense to wait until wait to see what the post brexit apocalpyse brings.

What does interes me is that lots of people have a different take of whether aerobatics in an aesa aircraft are permitted or not with a poo brown ppl(a)
#1674747
SamC wrote:So gets kicked down the road again. what's it now 6 years?
So no need to change my old ppl(a) yet as lapl privleages suit me fine and logically it makes sense to wait until wait to see what the post brexit apocalpyse brings.

What does interes me is that lots of people have a different take of whether aerobatics in an aesa aircraft are permitted or not with a poo brown ppl(a)



Last week we completed the recommended “Hard Brexit” due diligence preparation for our Club. Being an established European touring club with several hundred pilot members all with differing licences to understand it has been a trial. We have so far given advice to members as follows:

https://www.theeuropaclub.org/news/brex ... uropa-club


Trust this helps. We are not experts. The information changes as soon as we go to print.! Ultimately it’s the pilots responsibility to ensure he has contacted official sources and satisfied himself.