Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
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By agfoxx
#1660092
Hi guys

I'm being relocated to Boston for work, for at least a year, maybe more.

From a regulations point of view, what would I need to do to start flying there?

I've got a UK NPPL (microlight 3-axis and group A) and about 160 hours in a combination of microlights and C152/172. So no ICAO licence, but a bit of experience and some UK paperwork.

Thanks!
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By Paul_Sengupta
#1660104
As I see it, you have two options:

1) Obtain an ICAO licence in this country (or elsewhere) before going. This could mean an EASA licence or it could mean a UK national PPL, but I suspect trying to work out if the latter is possible and if so, what the route would be, is not going to be particularly easy. You can then get a 61.75 "based on" US certificate to fly in the US.

2) Obtain a US PPL. Credit for previous training can be found here:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/14/61.41

It says it will credit training received "in an ICAO country" but you'd have to work out what parts of your training would actually count - maybe that given in a certified "group A" aircraft by a full FI. I'm not familiar with the US law on this. I also don't know if there are different requirements for a US "sport pilot" or "recreational pilot" licence.

There is some information on the different variations here:

https://www.aopa.org/training-and-safety/learn-to-fly/become-a-pilot-types-of-certificates

Here's a FAQ about the "sport pilot" licence.

Some information the recreational pilot certificate.
By Bathman
#1660107
I would just go to America and get a standalone FAA PPL. Then you have a standalone ICAO PPL that's valid for life.

The FAA recognises flight training done elsewhere and they also recognise certain microlight hours flown in microlights (kolb and Eurostar).

You biggest problem is when you come back and you will think what a croc it is over here.
Last edited by Bathman on Mon Dec 24, 2018 8:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
T67M, agfoxx, JulietTango liked this
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By Flyingfemme
#1660310
What Bathman says. An FAA licence is forever and you can lapse your currency at any time without penalty. Getting it back is just a question of a new medical and a check flight with any FAA CFI. Very useful to have in your back pocket.
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By agfoxx
#1660437
Flyingfemme wrote:What Bathman says. An FAA licence is forever and you can lapse your currency at any time without penalty. Getting it back is just a question of a new medical and a check flight with any FAA CFI. Very useful to have in your back pocket.

Thank you!
Are there many FAA CFIs here in the UK? And what about N-Reg planes? Never looked into that!