Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
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#1666118
Deltapapa24 wrote:My flight school has told me they aren't allowed to do that anymore, if I want to fly in the meantime it would have to be dual... So I may as well just wait. I done a check ride on the C172 last week actually, so I could stay current and so I can fly that when the magic piece of paper comes through.


It might be worth tactfully pointing them to the latest CAA guidance on this: https://www.caa.co.uk/Flights-after-completing-a-skill-test.aspx - it came under discussion last year so has been clarified.
Dave W, Deltapapa24 liked this
#1666190
I find it unbelievable that schools can afford to turn away customers with lack of knowledge.

And for those who don’t like clicking on links, as helpfully provided by Alan C:

The CAA confirms that a student pilot may be permitted to operate an aircraft as the sole occupant, provided the flight is authorised and supervised by the holder of a valid Flight Instructor Certificate, within the following criteria:

The Competent Authority and State of Licence issue will be the UK CAA.
The Flight Instructors and training organisations authorising the solo flights must be sure that the student pilot has made application to the UK CAA for the issue of the licence.
Such flights should be for the benefit of the student pilot, to keep their skills at an appropriate level for the safe operation of the aircraft and enforce the training they have received.
All authorised solo flights must be conducted in accordance with relevant legislation and the Approved Training Organisation’s (ATO) approved manuals or the Registered Training Facilities (RF) - Flying Order Book.
The student pilot can only be authorised solo in an aircraft of the same class or type that was used during the Skill Test.
Once the student pilot is in receipt of their licence, unless the licence is a Light Aircraft Pilot Licence (LAPL) or otherwise instructed by the UK CAA, they are not permitted to be authorised solo by the Flight Instructor for future flights.
All Flight Instructors are reminded that they will be authorising the solo pilot to operate flights in accordance with FCL.020 of the EASA Aircrew Regulations and if through an ATO in accordance with the ATO’s approved manuals and if through a RF in accordance with the RF’s Flying Order Book.
JAFO, Deltapapa24 liked this
#1666206
Once the student pilot is in receipt of their licence, unless the licence is a Light Aircraft Pilot Licence (LAPL) or otherwise instructed by the UK CAA, they are not permitted to be authorised solo by the Flight Instructor for future flights.

I am baffled by this paragraph.
#1666237
AndyR wrote:I find it unbelievable that schools can afford to turn away customers with lack of knowledge.


And I find it unbelievable that ATO Ops inspectors told at least one ATO that they were not allowed to authorise solo flight to "students" post GST.

Fortunately some weeks later the CAA cleared up the ambiguity but that wasn’t until a significant amount of business had been lost.
#1666302
"The Flight Instructors and training organisations authorising the solo flights must be sure that the student pilot has made application to the UK CAA for the issue of the licence."

Another annoying technicality there.

If you have passed the skills test but have not completed the FRTOL practical, or are waiting for a signature from someone in the school before sending the application (e.g. a logbook check) then you can't fly.

That said these technicalities are our own pedantic doings, the CAA seems to be quite clear that flights for the purposes of maintaining currency/recency are perfectly fine.

My issue with this whole thing now is why they can't temporarily ramp up staff. If there is a significant increase in applications then there would be an increase in fees (you would expect).

I wouldn't want to waste their time with a freedom of information request but I genuinely wonder how many people (FTE) are working on the backlog and what the real wait average time is. The website states one thing but people who ring them seem to be told something else.

Also whether GA licences are basically only fitted in once the expedited Commercial licences/whatever chased by airlines are finished.

If there were two authorised licencing organisations and people could choose I am sure they would up their game.
#1666456
LD1Racing wrote:CAA updated their website to say week commencing 21st January now! Just keep kicking that can...


https://www.caa.co.uk/General-aviation/ ... plications


As an example

Typical turnaround times for applications are currently 19 working days but certain licence types may take up to 28 working days.


They have updated the date for their update. But this is still there.

Is this a factual inaccuracy? or is it some sort of average.
#1666473
PapaEchoNovember wrote:Maybe the update on the Week commencing the 21st will be

We understand that delays are frustrating for applicants. We are working hard to bring the turnaround time down and we will provide an update in the week commencing 28 January 2019.


I wouldn't bet against it.
#1667023
Deltapapa24 wrote:Spoke to the CAA again today and they are currently progressing applications they received on the 21st November today.. So seem to be running with a two month delay at the moment.

They said they got mine on the 29th November so we shall see where we are on the 29th January...


Given that mine went in on the 19th November, I should hopefully receive something imminently. I'll let you know.
#1668181
So... The CAA finally looked at my application 39 working days after receiving it. And they have rejected it, as one of the written paper numbers entered by my flight school were incorrect.

I have sent the correct paper number to them ASAP and I am now told my application now goes back to the bottom of the pile of new applications. And the time Is currently 23 working days. (Which as we know is incorrect).

I have no words...