Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
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By Jason_MMK
#1890495
Hi everyone , I wonder if anyone here can give me some advice please. I started my PPL training in the late 90's (im 47 now) and during the training I suffered with a Migraine with aura , which temporarily distorted my vision ,obviously I stopped flying at that point and since then in the last 20 years I have suffered with just 2 more attacks.
Looking on the CAA medical information it quite rightly says that this is a preventative condition , however im wondering if there's any way of continuing my training but in a dual pilot capacity (I hope this makes sense?). I desperately miss is , and am really keen to find a way back.
Thanks for any advice folks.

Jason.
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By Rob P
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1890557
Welcome Jason. :D

You would need to talk to the flying school of choice. You do not need a medical of any sort to be a student, and if you would be content with never logging P1 and always having a safety pilot with you (actually the P1) they would doubtless take you through the whole course with some agreement that those exercises that you would have flown solo, the instructor would stay quiet and non-assisting other than to save you both from certain death if you had an episode.

Rob P
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By Mz Hedy
#1890564
I am not a medic, but if you are content to fly on a UK-NPPL pilot self-declare medical then occasional migraines are not an issue. Basically, if you are allowed to drive yourself to the airfield you are considered fit to fly.

Modern microlights and sub-2000kg light aircraft are very different beasts to what they were in the '90s when you last flew. There are some very posh motor gliders out there too waiting to be flown.

I'm sure someone will be able ot come on and give you the long and the short of it, but I'm pretty sure two migraine in 20 years won't be an issue.

You could chat with these people at the BMAA.
By stevewarbs
#1890566
Mz Hedy wrote:I am not a medic, but if you are content to fly on a UK-NPPL pilot self-declare medical then occasional migraines are not an issue. Basically, if you are allowed to drive yourself to the airfield you are considered fit to fly.

Modern microlights and sub-2000kg light aircraft are very different beasts to what they were in the '90s when you last flew[/url].


And with the new 600kg limit, Rotax 912 powered microlights will cruise at 100mph using far less fuel than the old spam cams.

The main differences being VFR only and 2 seats
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By Flyin'Dutch'
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1890579
@Jason_MMK

Welcome to these shores. It is difficult to give accurate advice based on a posting only but it is possible to get a medical certificate with a history of migraine. It very much depends on history, frequency, severity.

You could do worse than to discuss your medical history with your previous AME or if he/she has hung up their stethoscope to contact a friendly AME or the medical advisor to the LAA and BGA.
By Duncan36
#1896083
stevewarbs wrote:If you are anywhere near Coventry I could offer a flight in a Skyranger


Hi Steve

Are there many farm strips around Coventry? I’m trying to work out what licence you go for and I’m seriously tempted to forget the PPL and go for the NPPL as I like the idea of flying the smaller planes like the C42 and. Skyranger.

Cheers

Duncan
By Duncan36
#1896136
HI Steve

Thanks for the PM. I'm a new member, so don't have permission to reply as yet. Hopefully after a few more posts, that will change.

I'm based in Balsall Common, so not too far from you.