Polite discussion about EASA, the CAA, the ANO and the delights of aviation regulation.
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#1693661
If it's an EASA licence you will need to do refresher training at an ATO or DTO (EASA requirement) & the training organisation will have to include your aircraft in their paperwork.


Not strictly true if the class rating has expired by three years or less, since there has been a recent change to the regulations. See FCL.740 (b)(ii)(2), which can be found in the Easy Access Rules for Flight Crew Licensing (Part-FCL) at page 853/854. :wink:

Cookie


EASA link edited
Last edited by Cookie on Thu May 16, 2019 7:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
Bathman liked this
#1693682
Thanks for the link Cookie, there's an 'l' at the end of your [url= . . . ] which leads to a 404 Page not found.

ALTSEL, the relevant para FCL.740 (b)(2)(ii) says:
(ii) at a DTO, at an ATO or with an instructor, where the rating expired for no more than three years and the rating was a non-high-performance single-engine piston class rating or a TMG class rating.

so if you're 4 years lapsed you will have to go to an EASA training organisation.

The interesting bit is the subsequent AMC1 FCL.740(b):
(e) Taking into account the factors listed in (a) above, the ATO, the DTO or the instructor, as applicable, may also decide that the applicant already possesses the required level of proficiency and that no refresher training is necessary.

Presumably you could do as much flying as you like with a friendly instructor & only go to an ATO/DTO for the assessment & proficiency check.
#1693722
What a dogs dinner- it’s a shame Brexit does not include divorcing EASA as well


That is utter garbage. Just cast your mind back to the requirements to regain PPL(A) privilges which used to exist before EASA - they were FAR more onerous.

If the UK was stupid enough to leave EASA, the additional staff needed at the CAA would mean that all pilot licensing costs would increase significantly. By up to a factor of 300%, I've heard....
Kittyhawk, kanga liked this
#1693747
Cookie wrote:
If it's an EASA licence you will need to do refresher training at an ATO or DTO (EASA requirement) & the training organisation will have to include your aircraft in their paperwork.


Not strictly true if the class rating has expired by three years or less, since there has been a recent change to the regulations. See FCL.740 (b)(ii)(2), which can be found in the Easy Access Rules for Flight Crew Licensing (Part-FCL) at page 853/854. :wink:

Cookie


EASA link edited


That’s a new one for me many thanks :thumleft:
#1693900
In days gone by, 'renewal of PPL aircraft rating privileges' depended upon when the pilot had last flown as PIC. If it was between 26 months and 5 years, a course of training and a specific 'flight test' was required. The test itself involved a cross-country flight to another aerodrome not less than 50 nm from the departure aerodrome, a circuit and landing at the destination aerodrome and a return flight to the aerodrome of departure....

If more than 5 yr since the last flight as PIC, the candidate had to apply to the CAA for assessment of the dual and solo training required and the subsequent testing requirement. I'm not sure, but I seem to recall that some of the exams also had to be re-taken.

Much easier under Part-FCL- it's just training as required and a proficiency check.

As for CAA fees? The CAA had to make a 6% return thanks to that old woman with the handbag who believed that privatisation was a universal solution for everything and that 'greed is good'. I don't think that the CAA ever made its 6% though, but costs were certainly slashed.
kanga liked this