For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
#1838216
The proliferation of takeaway food shops is a major contributor to town and city waste on the streets. After a skinfull in the pub their wares seem to be an irresistible magnet for the staggering masses who chomp their way through the carton contents while weaving their way home before dropping the empty container wherever they happen to be. The closure of pubs in recent months has made a noticeable difference to the amount of such litter in some places.

PW
AndyR liked this
#1838231
Jim Jones wrote:Prove it.
I don’t usually add old correspondence to my rubble.

That's certainly what a lot of people will rely on, but putting the moral case aside maybe a neighbour dobs you* in, or perhaps your woman-in-a-van gets caught (as many do) and decides she's not taking all the rap for a hundred quid.

For added excitement, you could appear on Youtube. :lol:

*Obviously not actually you, another you.



Propwash wrote:The proliferation of takeaway food shops ...


I quite like the idea that every outlet is required to have their business address on it and give councils the legal powers to A. spot check premises to make sure they are using identifiable wrapping, and B. to charge a quid for every item recovered as litter.
#1838257
I had a large litter-box outside my chippy, the size of 2 standard dustbins side-by side. It was installed ,serviced and maintained by Tameside council. Never full to overflowing,yes there was a problem with lazy patrons. It is NOT the fault of the vendors, but the consumer

Australia had a huge advertising campaign , aimed to shame the people who thought it OK to turn their environment into a a tip. It was , apparently, pretty successful.

As a generation has appeared to abrogate their responsibility to instil a sense of Civic Responsibility in their spawn, perhaps the education curriculum needs a big rethink . :twisted: The children may then shame their ignorant parents into modifying their behaviour.
eltonioni liked this
#1838275
eltonioni wrote:
I quite like the idea that every outlet is required to have their business address on it and give councils the legal powers to A. spot check premises to make sure they are using identifiable wrapping, and B. to charge a quid for every item recovered as litter.


How hard would it be for Drive-Thru's to print vehicle registrations on cups and bags?
eltonioni, Aerials, Rob P and 1 others liked this
#1838276
Sooty25 wrote:
eltonioni wrote:
I quite like the idea that every outlet is required to have their business address on it and give councils the legal powers to A. spot check premises to make sure they are using identifiable wrapping, and B. to charge a quid for every item recovered as litter.


How hard would it be for Drive-Thru's to print vehicle registrations on cups and bags?

Yup. If the outlets knew that they were going to be charged (say) a quid for a littered cup they would quickly find ways to incriminate customers instead of themselves which doesn't appear too unreasonable if they can. Seems like the bones of legislation most people would be in favour of.

@cockney steve The bad 'uns will give the good 'uns a bad name. Mind you, there might be halfway compromises such as if chips wrappers were rapidly biodegradable.
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1838322
cockney steve wrote: As a generation has appeared to abrogate their responsibility to instil a sense of Civic Responsibility in their spawn, perhaps the education curriculum needs a big rethink . :twisted: The children may then shame their ignorant parents into modifying their behaviour.

Maybe just explaining to the spawn that litter costs them money in the form of council tax and other taxes?
#1838341
I have noticed more and more people, not just the young but a pretty even cross section are “selfishly entitled”.
Just look at the verge where the A3 meets the M25 at the lights. That’s not kids, that’s their parents.
“People are paid to pick this stuff up” is what they are likely to say.
Around Blackbushe the good citizens of Yateley have transformed the A30 by picking up all the litter so there are many good people out there.
By johnm
#1838436
Flyingfemme wrote:And they need to understand that they are the ones paying these people.


They take pride in having servants and, being poorly bred, don't treat them with proper respect either. :twisted:
#1838662
johnm wrote:
Flyingfemme wrote:And they need to understand that they are the ones paying these people.


They take pride in having servants and, being poorly bred, don't treat them with proper respect either. :twisted:

As has been shown in experimental psychology, people who pay a fee or a fine feel entitled. The classic case, described by Nobel laureate Daniel Kahnemann, is the Israeli daycare center where the staff introduced a fine for late pick-ups in the hope of parents coming on time. The result: the exact opposite. "I pay the fine, so it's ok to be late." Shame has proven to be a better motivator, but that certainly doesn't work on everybody. The sign that the local government in York put up (that I posted earlier) plays on that: making people feel guilty with the aid of a bit of humour.

But it's not a new phenomenon, so don't blame young people in general. In fact, I'd say that young people are more respectful of the local as well as the global environment.
kanga liked this
#1838675
akg1486 wrote:But it's not a new phenomenon, so don't blame young people in general. In fact, I'd say that young people are more respectful of the local as well as the global environment.


Yeah, looks it...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-56623504

Around here it's all young people who throughout the pandemic have congregated and drunk together, and left the empty boxes, cans and bottles where they fall. They're scattered around all the beauty spots and all the lay-bys. Even if they're in a car they can't be bothered taking their empties home and dump them in the lay-by.
#1838686
Paul_Sengupta wrote:
akg1486 wrote:But it's not a new phenomenon, so don't blame young people in general. In fact, I'd say that young people are more respectful of the local as well as the global environment.


Yeah, looks it...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-56623504

Around here it's all young people who throughout the pandemic have congregated and drunk together, and left the empty boxes, cans and bottles where they fall. They're scattered around all the beauty spots and all the lay-bys. Even if they're in a car they can't be bothered taking their empties home and dump them in the lay-by.

I'm not saying that no young people litter, I'm saying that young people today don't litter more than young people back in the day. And I'm not saying that things are fine.

Most of us wouldn't dream of leaving a mess behind after an outdoor picnic or whatnot. Sadly, a large proportion of us would be ok to litter if other people have already started to make a mess, so it only takes a small percentage of people who don't care at all to get things going and it accelerates. To stop the mess from starting is however no easy thing. Social control works well in places like Japan, and from personal/anecdotal evidence I'd say it works better in Germany than in the UK.
kanga, PropPeter liked this
By johnm
#1838691
Part of the issue is the growth in opportunity for litter and the persistence of the materials. Much of what we see lying around didn't even exist 60 years ago....
#1838701
It isn't the material that is the issue it is the mentality. We may have had different types of packaging in the 1950s and 60s but generally people used the street litter bins to deposit their used sweet wrappers, wooden lolly sticks or whatever or took them home. Deposits on bottles may have encouraged their return to the point of origin rather than being discarded, but it is social attitude not plastic or aluminium that is in need of change to tackle litter.

PW
JAFO liked this