For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
  • 1
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
User avatar
By TheFarmer
#1827736
The current weather pattern of very wet winters and then a sudden dry few months in Spring has caused arable farmers in the UK a lot of headaches in the last few years.

Waiting for the land to dry out, and taking us past the optimum planting date, and then no moisture for the crop to get up and away has been the demise of many Spring planted crops.

Farmers with low lying and/or heavy clay land suffer even more, because the drying out process takes even longer.

Autumn planted crops don’t suffer quite the same as they’re already established and can survive extreme wet/dry much better.
#1827739
Charles Hunt wrote:adieu
newly mown stripes
formerly pristine
lawn


It needs another cut, anyway. :thumright:

As for pristine lawn - I wish. Think well groomed paddock. The grass here grows in front of your eyes.

At least the soil here is very silty. Everything drains very quickly, unlike the clay type soils to which the Farmer refers. The Farmer would probably love these growing conditions. The farmers in the fields around here seem to be able to grow anything.
Charles Hunt liked this
By Nick
#1827787
TheFarmer wrote:The current weather pattern of very wet winters and then a sudden dry few months in Spring has caused arable farmers in the UK a lot of headaches in the last few years.


Autumn planted crops don’t suffer quite the same as they’re already established and can survive extreme wet/dry much better.


How about slug infestation and black grass? These compete with winter sown crops.

Nick
User avatar
By Paul_Sengupta
#1827793
Miscellaneous wrote:Me too, I'm particularly interested in the profit we make being distributed. :thumright: Can you confirm it will be fiscal year 21/22? :D


It'll be distributed in relation to the amount invested...
User avatar
By TheFarmer
#1827799
How about slug infestation and black grass? These compete with winter sown crops.


Black grass only really physically competes in winter drilled crops when it explodes into action in the spring. Over winter, it slowly develops as a small grassy plant and then stifles the cereal crop in the spring, robbing it of nutrients. It’s a major problem to control with selective chemistry - and I’ll cover that topic in a week or two.

Slugs tend to put the crop at risk as it emerges and in the first month of its life. Come November, most of the pressure has gone because the leaf area is big enough to take the pressure, and slugs slow down as temperatures drop too.
By Bill McCarthy
#1827800
The weeks of ground frost here will have wiped out most slugs. Ploughing for the spring crop won’t take place until late March or into April. Black grass has never been a problem this far north but we do get Yellow Rocket (?)(skeeolag) which is easy to deal with.
User avatar
By PeteSpencer
#1827804
Local BBC News last night interviewed a Suffolk (might have been Norfolk) farmer with 6,000 tonnes of sugarbeet still in the soil.

British Sugar factory in Bury and in Norfolk whose seasons should end today are extending for a week or so so they can lift it.
By Nick
#1827827
Around this area Black Grass and slug are a real problem. Heavy clay soil fairly warm and wet. Therefore winter planting is not ideal. A break crop followed spring planting is generally prefered. Looking at the high level of rain again this year though, I fear spring planting may be late.

Nick
By Bill McCarthy
#1827855
For some strange reason we never get big enough downpours in the north to cause flooding, or enough to seriously erode topsoil. Strong winds are our bugbear - nice green grass one day, then the cold winds come and burn every blade.
#1827905
TheFarmer wrote:The current weather pattern of very wet winters and then a sudden dry few months in Spring has caused arable farmers in the UK a lot of headaches in the last few years.


Living by a river in a floodplain, I'm obsessive about keeping records of river levels that give us problems. In the past 15 years I've lived here the vast majority of times the river has reached extreme heights in the town just upriver have been in the past three years.

It used to be that if we got through December and January we could stop worrying, but now we get regular issues from October to the end of February.

It does seem to be becoming the new normal.
By johnm
#1827908
The water meadows in the lower part of the village are now full for the bulk of the winter and the medieval flood relief system is called into play from time to time from December through to the end of Feb.

Footpaths are a sea of mud and their increased use during lockdown has hit farmers quite a bit as people walk through crops to stay off the mud, but that widens the path. Some have gone from 1 metre wide to 8 to 10 metres wide or even more :(
User avatar
By Sooty25
#1827909
PeteSpencer wrote:Local BBC News last night interviewed a Suffolk (might have been Norfolk) farmer with 6,000 tonnes of sugarbeet still in the soil.

British Sugar factory in Bury and in Norfolk whose seasons should end today are extending for a week or so so they can lift it.


Yup, still got beet in the ground at ours which can't be lifted as the ground is too wet to get machines on. It happened last year as well and both Bury and Cantley processors closed before the last was lifted. The last lot ended up being trucked to Lincoln, obviously taking another slice out of the margin.
#1828042
Newark Factory more likely.

It is quite common for British Sugar to close their four beet processing factories at different times and divert remaining deliveries to the one(s) remaining open later.

Newark is predicted to remain open right through March and possibly into April this year , dependant on harvesting progress.
  • 1
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11