For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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#1784896
johnm wrote:@eltonioni In respect of items 1, 2 and 3 did you actually comprehend what I wrote????

I assume that NHS front line workers were wearing PPE

Primary care only got PPE very recently (Mrs E's firm only started habitually wearing it last week) although it's of little consequence really because the point is that they are in a network of workers carrying on with a life of going to work, kids at school, public transport, and they are STILL not catching it. Your three people who are off work / social isolating aren't remotely comparable as a group.

This is all a mere supporting act to the only thing I have a problem with - that compulsory masks will maintain fear and prevent people getting back to work and some kind of normality.

If there's a sudden spike of economic activity when masks become compulsory my concerns will have been unfounded and we're better off.

I don't think that will happen though and if I am even half right you fearful / fearmongers need to find another solution fast because you're keeping us in the brown stuff and the chancellor is coming for your pensions, savings and assets. The deficit just went up by a factor of 4x from last year.

I want to be wrong. God help us if I'm right.
#1784900
For most of the time, wearing a mask will be a waste of time.

But you don't know when it isn't until it's too late for someone else's granny. The person you infect will most likely be a carer of some kind who will have a few days to pass it around before their next test.

I'll wear the mask when asked. In my day job a visor would have been more use - close contact with low paid staff from known hot spots - but apparently it's not acceptable to treat your customers as plague ridden zombies.
#1784911
Pete L wrote:I'll wear the mask when asked. In my day job a visor would have been more use - close contact with low paid staff from known hot spots - but apparently it's not acceptable to treat your customers as plague ridden zombies.


Presumably you do have the right to ask people entering your premises to wear masks though, right? And you do have the right as an employee to PPE if you feel it is required...

Or are you suggesting (as I did) that people dont like to wear masks or that masks and PPE do actually instill a sense of fear into people as I think @eltonioni is saying.... :wink:

Regards, SD..
#1784914
Paul_Sengupta wrote:
eltonioni wrote:possibly living in close proximity


We're all living in close proximity. I wouldn't mind betting that more people live in closer proximity in cities in Britain than they do in Brittany.

True, although you and I aren't migrant workers living in a caravan with the same people you work with in the cold meat plant until you return home to the caravan. Neither are we spending our time in the hospital or care home that's already riddled with the virulent strains of C19.
#1784928
I didn't say "all" but your Brittany note inspired me to Google "Brittany reason for increase in r rate" which with miserable predictability came up with this article. The photo is relevant if dated.

https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-healt ... KKCN24I1IN

John's note on a Herefordshire spike from the other day came up with similar - migrant farm workers in caravans. As I said, the multiple of anecdote isn't evidence but there's nothing else filling the void that I've seen now that care home and hospital deaths seem to have washed through. (A poor turn of phrase but you know what I mean).

Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to downplay the general situation that it's out there but neither am I looking for tenuous reasons to support my bais fears either. Unless I have missed something, we're just not seeing spikes from the gatherings that people were losing their minds about a few weeks ago. Anyone would be forgiven for thinking that it's not as fecund as we've been led to believe.



#1784959
Back from my meeting now:

1. Your 73 yo friend is vulnerable, very vulnerable. Stay safe - wear proper PPE, isolate.


She is a very determined and intelligent lady who had the disease and recovered and is now leading a normal active life within the constraints of her MS and sensible practical precautions.

2. Your young and healthy son sounds fine I hope - did he actually test positive? No consequences.


As I said he had a positive antibody test (as did my friend above) but neither have had an antigen test.

3. Good to hear that C19 was of zero consequence for the 89 YO, although it's statistically likely that your friend picked up C19 in the hospital after the fall.


He'd have had to be bloody quick to pick it up as they tested him on admission as a precaution.

The bit that @eltonioni doesn't seem to comprehend is that most people will resume activity if they can see a sensible risk management strategy. Nobody in their right mind believes the risk has gone away. Nor does anybody in their right mind believe that making prisoners of the old and vulnerable is a sensible way forward.
#1784966
johnm wrote: The bit that @eltonioni doesn't seem to comprehend is that most people will resume activity if they can see a sensible risk management strategy.


I fully comprehend, I simply disagree that "most people will resume activity".

Although I've said it quite a few times you've not, err, well, y'know... understood. :lol:
#1784994
@johnm I understand what you are saying but disagree that full resumption of "normal" life will ensue. I haven't stopped going to "work" every day, nor have plenty of people at the airport. I am shopping for groceries less than I would normally - daily shopping is the norm so I actually get out and see people/get fresh air. Eating and drinking out for pleasure (rather than necessity) and shopping for clothes/shoes/stuff are not happening any time soon because I can't be ar$$ed with all the queueing/masking and not trying things on to my satisfaction. And this from somebody who has been wearing a very limited selection of clothes for the last four months.........I left home in February for a two week trip with a carry-on suitcase of winter clothes! So my money is (mostly) staying in my pocket and that will be bad for the economy.
#1785011
eltonioni wrote:
johnm wrote: The bit that @eltonioni doesn't seem to comprehend is that most people will resume activity if they can see a sensible risk management strategy.


I fully comprehend, I simply disagree that "most people will resume activity".

Although I've said it quite a few times you've not, err, well, y'know... understood. :lol:



I understand perfectly that's why I know that you are wrong :D

People are already starting to resume activities but cautiously and that covers all age groups as far as I can tell. I have not suggested that things will return to anything like normal any time soon I have suggested and observed that folk will start to expand their horizons and as long as we keep things under control they will continue to expand. If things go out of control we're in seriously deep doodoo.

@Flyingfemme you'll be amazed to learn that I understand what you mean!!

We appear in some shop or other most days, but the modus operandi has changed. My mode of shopping has always been to simply go and buy something I need, MrsJohnm does the same but adds the concept of "while I'm here I'll have a look around this or that and perhaps buy it." At the moment the additional concept is largely absent.

She has a favoured clothes shop in Cirencester and that has reopened on an appointment basis with masks and sanitiser and she has had one appointment thus far, she and I have also had haircuts....the first since January in my case.
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