For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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By Miscellaneous
#1795466
@Charliesixtysix I'm becoming more intrigued. How does the business model work? Is return calculated on a %age yield, EG 75% of acreage sown? Or as I think more likely, is it simply a case of the farmer gets going rate with any shortfall in yield losses being his loss?
By Bill McCarthy
#1795487
Yet, in Scotland there have been record yields due to OUR dry spring - 18 t/ha wheat in St Andrews. Neighbours spring barley yield up 20%. I’m still struggling to get my spring oats combined - it flattened overnight recently in a stormy night with heavy rain. It too looks like a heavy crop but the weather is now against me.
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By Charliesixtysix
#1795534
Misc: Mostly cereal farmers are price takers as you describe - you can hedge against price fluctuation by forward selling but you need you be sure you will have the product to meet the sale. Thus most folk only sell part of their expected yield ahead of harvest and accept market price on the remainder, selling when they think price is at its best ( or to meet cashflow needs).
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By Charles Hunt
#1795967
Re Harry's farm. If you had one poor yielding crop, and one valuable one ready to go, wouldn't you get the valuable one in first?
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By Charliesixtysix
#1795969
Not all crops ( or even varieties of the same crop) ripen at the same time. Harry's wheat was only just coming ready as he explained in the video. A sensible cropping plan factors this in to spread the workload through the harvesting period.
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By matthew_w100
#1796067
I agree! Going for a covid walk in the fields every (other, if I'm honest) day has sparked a "what is it/how is it changing" fascination for all things bucolic. I am very grateful to the farmers on here for helping me out.
By Highland Park
#1796073
Fascinating thread. Although I live in and was brought up in a rural part of England, I’ve always felt (to my shame) that my knowledge around this subject has been lacking and I need to improve it...

Ian
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By matthew_w100
#1796195
Charliesixtysix wrote:Bad luck - she is. :thumleft:


Is linseed used for both seeds (presumably to make oil) and flax fibre from the one crop? Or do you have different varieties or harvesting methods and times for the two purposes?
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By Charliesixtysix
#1796212
Normally it is only the seed that has significant value. The straw can be chopped and incorporated if favourable conditions at harvest - or baled and removed if not.
Use of the baled straw varies according to local demand but is unlikely to be of any great value. Sometimes it can go for power station fuel but linseed straw Is not the preferred crop for them to burn unless there is a shortage of better material, so it is not uncommon for it to be stacked up and still there a year later whilst the proud owner decides what to do with it... :roll:

@TheFarmer what did you do with your winter linseed straw this year?
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By TheFarmer
#1796253
It was baled up and used as sacrificial ‘top bales’ on the outside wheat and barley straw stacks.