For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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By matthew_w100
#1780947
Can anyone point me at a resource - online or paper-ware - that would help me identify crops growing in the fields, at their various stages? I walk through them on my daily exercise and I'd love to know a bit more about what I'm seeing. Google has not been very helpful in, for example, distinguishing between wheat and barley unless I'm a glider pilot looking for an outlanding. Even my Reader's Digest "The British Countryside" has failed me!

We saw what I thought were peas and what my household thought were broad beans today, which is a fight that needs to be resolved. And another field with bushy stuff with blue flowers that wasn't lavender.

I probably also need a resource to tell me how to make Google work :-)
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By TheFarmer
#1780951
Just put a pic here. I’ll help you out.

C66 used to have an excellent website that identified them all for glider pilots. But we are talking 15 years ago.

As an aside, there are about 400 times more field beans grown in the UK arable rotation than field peas. Both are harvested dry, mostly for animal consumption. Saying that, peas are making a comeback due to the unviability of oilseed rape now, so all is not lost with your dignity yet!
By Bill McCarthy
#1780956
Most of those crops you will not see in Scotland - oats and barley perhaps - but land in a field of needs or kale, you would know all about it ! I’m going to try bere next year, a 90 day cereal crop - foodies have been to Orkney and it has become all the rage (again).
@Farmer - you must have been through a few grain moisture meters by now - can you recommend a sub£500 one?
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By mmcp42
#1780979
TheFarmer wrote:As an aside, there are about 400 times more field beans grown in the UK arable rotation than field peas. Both are harvested dry, mostly for animal consumption. Saying that, peas are making a comeback due to the unviability of oilseed rape now, so all is not lost with your dignity yet!


why so?
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By TheFarmer
#1780981
@Farmer - you must have been through a few grain moisture meters by now - can you recommend a sub£500 one?


The Wile products are quite good @Bill McCarthy . Built well and easy to use. :thumleft:
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By TheFarmer
#1780982
mmcp42 wrote:
TheFarmer wrote:As an aside, there are about 400 times more field beans grown in the UK arable rotation than field peas. Both are harvested dry, mostly for animal consumption. Saying that, peas are making a comeback due to the unviability of oilseed rape now, so all is not lost with your dignity yet!


why so?


Seed dressing that contained a pesticide called neonicitinoid was banned a few years ago as apparently it harmed bees. No bee keeper I ever spoke with said they thought it was a problem, but it was banned anyway.

So, the pest that it was used for (cabbage stem few beetle) has now taken hold, and despite farmers spraying millions of gallons of additional insecticide each year to try and save the rape crop each autumn, most of us have now given up growing it.

The irony is that bee numbers are now actually falling quickly as there isn’t any rape for them to forage in.... :roll:
CherokeePete, seanxair, Trent772 and 1 others liked this
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By Charliesixtysix
#1780997
TheFarmer wrote:Just found it.

http://www.fieldselection.co.uk/



Yes, last updated circa 2005, long before I had access to anything better than a piece of damp string dial up internet - hence the tiny, low resolution images- but it did its job at the time.

@OP - if you would like to post some images of the crops in question, I am sure the farming members here will do our best to identify them for you :thumleft:
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By skydriller
#1781013
matthew_w100 wrote:And another field with bushy stuff with blue flowers that wasn't lavender.


Linseed?

"Horrible stuff gets wrapped around anything that moves and jams it" quote from my father who I seem to recall grew it one year as an experiment...

Regards, SD..
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By Charles Hunt
#1781030
A book simply called 'The Blue Field' mentions this and IIRC reckoned that as long as the sun was on it, it could be harvested without problem.

I assume Linseed = linen seed (sort of). Standing by for kanga's detailed explanation.....