Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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By matthew_w100
#1771171
All this enforced "You will exercise once a day" business has made the Vibram soles detach themselves from my walking boots. I can't find anything which is up to the job of sticking them back. I've tried all sorts, from Evostik to builders' "Sticks Like ****". They just fail after a couple of days and so I have to take a roll of tape with me wherever I go.

Any suggestions?
By johnm
#1771172
Gorilla glues are pretty good but you'll need to clean both surfaces now....
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By PeteSpencer
#1771174
Either new boots or visit your local cobbler/shoe repairer who will certainly have the answer :
(our local cobbler is much more versatile/resourceful than our local Timpsons in a hut in Tesco's car park)

Peter :wink:
By Cessna571
#1771227
EvoStik

The proper light brown stiff that’s solvent based that you can get high on.

It looks like opaque treacle, the colour of peanut butter.

We used to use it to stick soles back on shoes when I was a youngster.

Really will stick anything to anything, used to come in a tin.

Edit

This, it’s resin. Used in Shoe Repair shops to resole shoes up and down the country.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Evo-Stik-Impac ... B0001P03S8
By profchrisreed
#1771265
Sadly, I know more about glue than most people find comfortable in a conversation ...

Assuming EvoStik is the right glue, it will still fail unless applied properly.

1. Clean out all the old glue and dirt from the mating surfaces. This is the main cause of almost all glue failures.

2. Follow the instructions *exactly*. For EvoStik this means waiting until it is actually dry to the touch - tacky is too soon. RTFM.

3. You'll need to apply quite a lot of pressure to get a good bond. I guess you dont have a cobbler's last, so improvise something to go inside the shoe.

If you did all this and it failed then that kind of sole needs a specialist glue - no idea what.

Gorilla glue comes in different kinds now, none of them best in class in my view. The original foaming polyurethane was designed for gap filling in construction - it's quite a weak bond, but most other glues require no gap which is why it became popular. Makes a horrid mess as it foams, though.
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By matthew_w100
#1771302
Thanks for that, chaps! I will take Chris's slap on the wrist and have another go with the Evostik, but obeying the instructions to the letter. As I have a large pot of it. Shoe Goo also sounds interesting and will be my fall back option.

What I'm really after is the stuff my father used to stick down carpet and lino fifty years ago. I'm sure it was an impact adhesive and remember is stank of ammonia. When we tried to take the carpet up again the floorboards came with it. No idea what it was called though.
By cockney steve
#1771380
^^^^^ Copydex? Strong ammonia smell and IIRC a latex-based product.

Mate's father-in-law bought some sealed 45-gallon drums in an auction, back in the 60's.
He had no idea whet it was or the value. We were remodelling a ladie's hairdressing salon for mate's wife and it was fine for sticking plastic quilting to the cubicle walls (among other things)

@profchrisreed Why is it important to let contact-adhesive get touch-dry before bonding?

Shirley, if both surfaces are "wetted" then pressed together, - the solvent will evaporate anyway and a more homogenous layer of adhesive will result, as two dried surfaces will have high spots which give random-point intermittent bonds.

I worked briefly with a bouncy-castle manufacturer. He would wet-bond repair-patches and weight-down the patch overnight. A regular seasonal repair was used on a Spanish beach. the patches never lifted but sand eventually abraded through the material.

Cleaned repair-area with Acetone first.
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By mick w
#1771385
Having done whole Kitchens with Formica using Evo Stick , I can assure you C S , a perfect bond is only achieved by letting both surfaces go off , before bringing them together . For some strange reason , I used to love the smell ??. :wink: :thumright:
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By matthew_w100
#1771412
mick w wrote:Having done whole Kitchens with Formica using Evo Stick , I can assure you C S , a perfect bond is only achieved by letting both surfaces go off , before bringing them together .


Yes, I was also puzzled as to why. And of course it means you cant really squirt it into gaps twixt sole and shoe that are beginning to form. You have to separate them completely.
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By matthew_w100
#1771415
cockney steve wrote:^^^^^ Copydex? Strong ammonia smell and IIRC a latex-based product.

Mate's father-in-law bought some sealed 45-gallon drums in an auction, back in the 60's.
He had no idea whet it was or the value. We were remodelling a ladie's hairdressing salon for mate's wife and it was fine for sticking plastic quilting to the cubicle walls (among other things)


Yes! It smelled exactly like copydex. But it was more viscous and a lot tougher. It used to take a good ten minutes to get the lid off the tub!
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By PeteSpencer
#1771423
I used Evostick to stick back together the de-laminated soles of a pair of much loved and really comfortable Beach Flip-flops that, despite 'er indoors' wishes, I couldn't bear to chuck out.

That was 10 years ago and since then they've been soaked in pool water, seawater , sat in 30deg heat by the mediterranean poolside, traipsed across burning hot sand and they're still going strong.................

Peter :roll: