Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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By kanga
#1764971
On the Ottawa cycle paths there were some cyclists who seemed to want to go faster than me and others wanted (or could!). Bikes there seemed rarely to have bells, and the ones on our childrens', brought from UK, were admired by their contemporaies. These speedier types usually used the shout used in winter to warn crosscountry skers ahead of them on the (fabulous) groomed trails (also within the city) that there was a faster skier coming through; there was usually enough width for the slower ones easily to move to one side, and they did (skiers and cyclists), Canadians being almost invariably polite. The shout was piste, which sounded a bit strange to newly arrived Brits; probably not best copied in UK :)
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By Charliesixtysix
#1764993
malcolmfrost wrote:I used to cough loudly, but that's not appropriate now so I tend to whistle!



I find I have to tinkle far more often than I used to, but that could be an age thing.
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By riverrock
#1765018
Boxkite wrote:As far as I know, bells or something else are mandated by law.

When being sold, bells must be fitted.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010 ... ion/4/made
Supply of assembled bicycles
4
...
(3) The bicycle must be fitted with a bell which is of a category intended for use on bicycles.


And in Northern Ireland, a law from 1933 means you must have a bell:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/nisro/193 ... 042_en.pdf
7. A person shall not on a public highway ride a pedal cycle unless such cycle is fitted with and has affixed to its handlebar an efficient and effective bell or horn and is also fitted with effective front wheel and back wheel brakes.

I believe the Isle of Man has similar.
If you want to take your bike abroad, you must also have a bell, unless the rules in the country you are taking your bike into are less strict.
1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic http://www.unece.org/trans/conventn/Con ... fic_EN.pdf Article 44 refers.

However no law in Great Britain that says you need to keep the fitted bell on your bike.
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By Flyingfemme
#1765039
I have noticed a fair amount of cyclists on the roads around here when there is a perfectly good cycleway only a matter feet away.............
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By kanga
#1765042
Flyingfemme wrote:.. there is a perfectly good cycleway only a matter feet away.............


congratulations on finding somewhere in UK where the designated cycleway is actually 'perfectly good' (in surface condition, width, separation from pedestrians, safely marked and visible to drivers at and across junctions, ..) :wink:
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By Miscellaneous
#1765052
Had a call from and old school mate last week. He's delivering for Halfords and tells me the trucks are full of already sold bikes enroute their new owners.

Should be plenty nearly new second hand bargains available when this is all over. :thumright:

Maybe it's time I dragged the bike out, blew up the tyres and gave it a go. Bit hilly though! :(
By chevvron
#1765054
eltonioni wrote:I can't actually remember the last time I found one of those.

Try the eastern Oxford ring road. It's the bit off the dual carriageway with cars parked on it due to it not being used by cyclists.
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By ChampChump
#1765077
As I walk on pavements, happily nipping into the road for 6' separation, it occurred to me that I have been doing this also for cyclists.

:?
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By rf3flyer
#1765084
kanga wrote:congratulations on finding somewhere in UK where the designated cycleway is actually 'perfectly good' (in surface condition, width, separation from pedestrians, safely marked and visible to drivers at and across junctions, ..) :wink:

Quite so. I have, very briefly, ridden on cycle paths that were unrideable above about 12mph!
Then there is this sort of thing. Not far from me there is the absurdity, on a trunk road, of a roundabout where the cycle route begins at the entrances to the roundabout and ends at the exits. No cyclist on earth is going to give that the time of day!
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By Jim Jones
#1765088
kanga wrote:
Flyingfemme wrote:.. there is a perfectly good cycleway only a matter feet away.............

D
congratulations on finding somewhere in UK where the designated cycleway is actually 'perfectly good' (in surface condition, width, separation from pedestrians, safely marked and visible to drivers at and across junctions, ..) :wink:


There’s one linking Bradford to Leeds, cost £64m. It runs past my workplace and is part of my route to work. It has its own mini sweeper (and gritters for winter). On a good day , at normal peak you’re lucky to see 6 cyclists.
By riverrock
#1765092
Flyingfemme wrote:I have noticed a fair amount of cyclists on the roads around here when there is a perfectly good cycleway only a matter feet away.............

Well why don't we just bin the wasted money on the cycleway experiment that follow the course of roads and just improve the roads instead, if the cycleways are being ignored by everyone.
The road surfaces round here wouldn't be safe for bicycles either!
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By skydriller
#1765134
On French news last night, so all you UK cyclists out there can feel lucky.
Cycling exercise has been banned in France since the increased measures last month, which included defining no exercise further than 1km from your residence. As a result many cycle-ways in France were shut just like the shut beaches. A chap being interviewed was stopped & fined for cycling to work on one further than 1km from his house and he isnt the only one either. They are collectively not only contesting the fines but taking the govt to court for shutting many cycle-ways in France.

Vive la revolution... SD..
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