Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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#1763640
Colonel Panic wrote:No calls here, but I am finding my battery life is noticeably down recently, and wondered if the two are related? I have set the app to use location services at all times - maybe that was a bad thing to do?


Very much so!

I struggle very hard to get my 90 year old, self isolating, living alone in an isolated rural house, mother to accept my offers of help with food deliveries etc, so maybe the fact that requests for help from Joe Bloggs are few and far between is not that surprising?


I'd not be so sure on that. In another voluntary role I speak to an awful lot of isolated, scared and unwell folk, and there are an AWFUL lot of them out there, many of who don't have the kind of community / family support we've mentioned above. The problem for them will be the access to technology they may need to request support via GoodSam), but I'm not sure how support is "triaged" centrally to those with no access to tech.

FWIW I don't think the app is "crappy" at all: it has been used for a while now in all sorts of situations AFAIU. I think the co-ordination behind the current massive spike in demand may be the weak link. But for all we know demand IS being supplied - I just don't know.
Colonel Panic liked this
#1763641
Colonel Panic wrote:No calls here, but I am finding my battery life is noticeably down recently, and wondered if the two are related? I have set the app to use location services at all times - maybe that was a bad thing to do?


Hi, at the bottom of the "Me" screen is a slider which somehow is meant to adjust the accuracy of your location. If you have it to the left you have lower power consumption, if its to the right you use more. No idea why, but may be an answer to your question.
Colonel Panic liked this
#1763644
JoeC wrote:
eltonioni wrote:
Meantime, my 75 yo dad is still going shopping to the co-op over the road from the local C19 centre. It would be nice if a local volunteer could pick up milk and bread for him but there's no way of getting one of the million volunteers to drop some off.


Local social services should be coordinating help for those at risk and putting volunteers in place. Might be worth dropping them a line.


Not a cat in hells chance of that Joe. Same goes for 85yo mother in law who is at least staying home and not cycling to the allotment via the Co-op of Doom. They both just need a friendly neighbour like you or me to drop a few things off in return for a tenner. The idea that social services should be involved is anathema and you’d think that this app would have a way of putting requests in, not just farming them out (or not).
#1766961
Confession time.

I've had two live alerts over the past week and rejected both of them. Here's what happens; the siren blares, you click into app and the location of the alert appears with a choice to accept or reject. Both were within a few minutes walk.

#1 I was just about to head out the door on another errand so not knowing how long it would take or what was involved I rejected it.
#2 I was busy working at home and could have accepted it if I had half an idea what was involved or how long it would take, so I rejected it again.

Thinking about it afterwards, without any context to the alert the tasks need to go to people who can drop everything and go do whatever, whether it's a doorstep chat or a trip to the pharmacy. I'm pretty sure that I'll reject a third alert if they are like the first two.

On a side note, presumably other people are also recieving the long text emails with instructions to go to the website, watch videos, read and remember procedures, do's and don'ts, etc, etc. Even accepting the need to protect the vulnerable from harm there is a heck of a lot of bureaucratic friction in this NHS Volunteering system that's not present in the local Facebook groups that seem to be just getting on with it.
#1766965
I was a volounteer driver for a local charity, mostly trips to hospitals but occasionally shopping or hairdresser. Only bureaucracy was CRB check and a driver sheet for each trip.

As I'm over 70 I'm furloughed for the duration though as I'm in the vulnerable category.
kanga liked this
#1766972
johnm wrote:I was a volounteer driver for a local charity, mostly trips to hospitals but occasionally shopping or hairdresser. Only bureaucracy was CRB check and a driver sheet for each trip.

As I'm over 70 I'm furloughed for the duration though as I'm in the vulnerable category.

Similar experience when I was a proper NHS volunteer. Once the Trust had signed you off you got your superpower NHS ID badge* and away you went with your backstage pass.




* Mrs E has noticed a distinct set of new privileges when she wears her NHS lanyard and badge on the way to / from work. I'm encouraging her to flash it at the queue in the petrol station and supermarket but no kindly Thursday night clapper has bitten and got their wallet out yet. :lol:
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#1766976
I heard a rumor that NHS Scotland have only used 275 volunteers of the tens of thousands who signed up.

Most churches are helping locally. Some are coordinating via https://yourneighbour.org/ ( although only a small subset).
I've an uncle ( Anglican rector) who is coordinating his villages's volunteer groups, so don't discount than also a a source of volunteers or a way to volunteer at a local level. Churches are generally embedded in their communities.
#1766978
Email received recently from Red Cross re NHS volunteering in Scotland.
We know many of you would have hoped to have been asked to do something by now. The demand for our volunteers so far hasn't matched what we expected as situations have changed and developed, and communities have come together to support each other in ways we haven’t seen before. We're working closely with governments, local authorities, partners and voluntary food networks to make sure they know our volunteers across the UK are ready and available.

While we all remain positive and hope for the best, it's the duty of the British Red Cross to plan for all outcomes. You’re likely to be needed in the future, with the effect of the virus predicted to have lasting repercussions. So, you may not be deployed tomorrow, or next week, but when the time comes, we'll be in touch straightaway.
kanga liked this
#1766980
Should also say, there has been huge reorganisation of community and school based employees into direct care and hospitals.
My sis is a speech and language assistant working across a group of schools. She is currently administrating (and changing lots of sheets) in a CV19 testing ward at her local Northern Irish hospital. That redistribution of labour has removed the need for most volunteers.
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#1766986
I think people are getting on with it themselves. My SiL is a senior manager at a big tech corp and “working from home”. At the same time she is looking after her kids and recovering partner (he had the virus and they all isolated for 14 days) as well as mobilising an army of local yummy mummies. As soon as lockdown was announced they were on social media, leafletted the area and found out who needed what. They made arrangements with local suppliers to do shopping etc and are still doing it all every day. Government just moves too slowly.
kanga, eltonioni, Flyin'Dutch' and 1 others liked this
#1767009
My daughter didn't sign up to NHS Vols but off her own bat leafletted the immediate area round her house and now has a regular group of oldies for whom she shops:

The spin off is that she shops for us at the same time, so we can cut down on expensive Waitrose deliveries.

However, I do worry for her, going out to places like Tesco and Sainsbury's several times a week, each time exposing herself to risk. I try to support her by keeping her topped up with alcohol wipes , hand sanitiser and petrol money , but I cant get her to slow down.

Like I said elsewhere, she'd a very determined individual.

Peter
kanga, Flyin'Dutch', eltonioni and 1 others liked this
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