For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
User avatar
By akg1486
#1743878
eltonioni wrote:In a parallel universe the UK will buy a load of Chinese gear, reverse engineer it, commoditise it, then make and sell it under the 5Eyes® brand.

Some 20 years ago I saw several brochures from Huawei that contained network architecture diagrams (3G, at that time) that were clearly pilfered from my then-employer. Rumours at the time had it that the same could be said about their actual products when they were starting out.
User avatar
By eltonioni
#1783246
Just announced;
All Huawei kit gone from the network by 2027
2-3 year rollout delay
A few billions extra cost
Will be made illegal to buy huawei kit for telecoms.

Sanctions incoming. :guns: Good, that means new industrial opportunities. :guns: :guns:
Meantime, who's got Nokia / Ericsson shares?
By johnm
#1783249
Ericsson, Nokia and Samsung will now benefit I should imagine. However this is a political decision not a technical one.

There is no such thing as a secure network so even if the Chinese have specific access to Huawei switches it should be a matter of no consequence. If you need secure comms you need it to be secured at source and destination.
By riverrock
#1783273
My understanding is that this is because Huawei can no longer secure and be confident about their supply chain, now and in the future, due to the IP and chips that the US sanctions are blocking.
Huawei equipment is used throughout telephone networks, from landlines, exchanges, fibre to the cabinet to all parts of mobile from phones and routers to base stations and core network. It isn't clear to me which parts this announcement relates to (is it 5G only?).
User avatar
By Pete L
#1783293
I would think it's more likely Huawei has been banned because a "untrusted" supplier might not want to make the same pro-surveillance compromises as a "trusted" supplier, allowing the cosy arrangement where 5 countries choose to set the law aside and spy on their citizens by proxy. The fact that one of those surveilling nations has a truly nasty reputation for extra-territorial action just makes the complaints about Huawei look even more specious.

The last couple of lines of the speech was more interesting - a very small number of providers for the next round of fixed line infrastructure.
User avatar
By kanga
#1783648
Pete L wrote:I would think it's more likely Huawei has been banned because a "untrusted" supplier might not want to make the same pro-surveillance compromises as a "trusted" supplier...


Any evidence for this surmise, which seems a bit bizarre to me ?