For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
By Bill McCarthy
#1696638
I don’t care what anyone says, but to a Scotsman there is a something in bagpipe music that gives a helluva lift to the heart and can stir you to go through anything. I have watched the “World at War” umpteen times now above anything else, and especially the Normandy landing scenes and wondered how the hell they did it. Perhaps the stirring skirl o’ the pipes by Bill Millin at Sword gave that very lift to my kinfolk.
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By kanga
#1696652
Bill McCarthy wrote:I don’t care what anyone says, but to a Scotsman there is a something in bagpipe music that gives a helluva lift to the heart and can stir you to go through anything... Perhaps the stirring skirl o’ the pipes by Bill Millin at Sword gave that very lift to my kinfolk.


.. and Lord Lovat proving atonement for his forebears 200 years earlier ? .. :)
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By OCB
#1696654
Bill McCarthy wrote:I don’t care what anyone says, but to a Scotsman there is a something in bagpipe music that gives a helluva lift to the heart and can stir you to go through anything. I have watched the “World at War” umpteen times now above anything else, and especially the Normandy landing scenes and wondered how the hell they did it. Perhaps the stirring skirl o’ the pipes by Bill Millin at Sword gave that very lift to my kinfolk.


Bill, as daft as it might sound - not even to the Scots.

As has been said, Canadians, Oz/Kiwi/Gurgha etc probably went along wi’ the pipes.

I’ve been on a parade ground with a 200+ Scots Army band, up close and personal- and it’s the main reason why I say “the pipes” can grab you not even by the sphericals, but straight through to the soul. I agree - there seems to be something uncanny about that wailing instrument that bypasses the upper regions of thought processes. I genuinely don’t get it, but I can’t deny what I felt - it was testosterone boost x 1000.

I know when I spoke with a whole bunch of British/Commonwealth veterans of Normandy June ‘44, bagpipes wasn’t one of their enduring memories. Not being shot or blown up (from any side) was what they remembered most, more or less.

As romantic as it might sound, I presume that even the bagpipes can’t drown out the noise of several thousand large calibre weapons firing at each other + the tens of thousands of small arms, hundreds of landing craft, air support overhead (more than once mincing their own side) etc.

I spent as much time as I could talking to veterans back in 2004 around Arromanche eg , and since, when I got the chance.

June 6 2004 the French lit up the entire Normandy Coast for about 60km with pretty fireworks. At less than a meter I couldn’t hear a single thing my mate was saying, and we were several hundred meters from the mortar tubes banging out the crowd friendly sparkly things.

It would definitely be the last thing in my mind to doubt what D-Day veterans recall. I have seen the photos of a piper going ashore etc, but I do have my doubts that any bugger could hear anything above the din of the Atlantic Wall v the Allied Invasion.

I do know there were many pockets of completely unopposed landing, through chance or fortunate f&xk-ups.

Opposed landing June 1944, maybe a piper would give a bit of moral support, if I had been there tbh it probably would have - mainly because there was some other Scots nutter walking into withering dug in defensive fire, armed only with a 3 legged hollowed out haggis....
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By Paul_Sengupta
#1696745
OCB wrote: I did see the Afro Celt Sound System (free) at the Grand Place many years back. Lovely surprise that was, since I was genuinely just taking a short cut. Sounded more Indo/Pak than Afro to me, or at least the first album.


From what I've heard, it's a mix, or variety, of all three, Afro, Indo and Celt. Of course there are synergies; even bagpipes originated in north west India originally, making their way across the Middle East and North Africa, and there was a lot of Indian culture in Africa from times of the British Empire.

Their new song, a cover of "State of Independence" was played on the Mark Radcliffe folk show on Radio 2 last night.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0005dvc

Go to 14 mins in.
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By OCB
#1697059
Miscellaneous wrote:Time to get this thread back on track with some proper auld authentic Trad! :D



I genuinely hope in a couple of generations they realise the tartan tatt was a joke... :?

This for me is how I want Trad Scots music to be remembered:

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By Miscellaneous
#1697062
Ah think i'll stick wae Kenneth McKellar. You suggesting I should take ma kilt tae the coup? An wit aboot the tartan cerpit we jist fittid oan the stair? :shock:
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By OCB
#1697066
Miscellaneous wrote:Ah think i'll stick wae Kenneth McKellar. You suggesting I should take ma kilt tae the coup? An wit aboot the tartan cerpit we jist fittid oan the stair? :shock:


Aye, an whit aboot that cerpit oan yer stairs? Tak aboot thrawin yer knickers tae the wind! Whit wis rang wae the auld bare stairs?!! :scratch: :scratch:

Gittin awe Bearsden in yer auld age?
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By Genghis the Engineer
#1697140
Somewhat on topic, about 15 years ago I was on a flying holiday around the Hebrides. A change in weather had stranded us on Islay for a few days (hardly any hardship!) where I spotted a note about a traditional gaelic music concert that evening in the local village hall.

So my then partner and I went along, paid our money and sat down.

Wind and rain battering the outside of the hall, this lady walked out with the appearance of a middle aged housewife, and opened her mouth.



One of the most musically impressive experiences of my life, and I still have and regularly listen to a couple of her CDs.

Sadly the singer died in a pointless accident a few years later, depriving the world of somebody really quite remarkable.

G