Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
#1714267
From this article: https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2019/08/t ... wont-work/

Seems like a perfectly sensible approach.

Taylor was anxious about the interview. She doesn’t like being labelled a ‘vaccine denier’, considering it ‘a very sinister term’ that she feels is associated with the Holocaust and climate change. For Taylor, the term ‘denier’ says more about the people using it than about her, because they are refusing to engage, instead calling her names.

This is the standard approach to anti-vaxxers, and it’s one I find very tempting too. Aren’t they simply dangerous deniers who deserve to be shouted at for the damage they are doing?

The problem is that insults don’t work. Taylor shuts down whenever anyone calls her a denier. Those who study denialism say this is a common reaction and that the best way to fight it is not with accusations or, indeed, by presenting reams of facts but first by finding common ground. And there is common ground: the reason anti-vaxxers give for their stance is that they want to protect their children, which is the same reason there are national vaccine programmes.

Tali Sharot, professor of neuroscience at University College London agrees that you can’t start the discussion by disagreeing about facts. Don’t talk about the autism and vaccine link, she says. Instead talk about what we agree on.

One group of researchers from the University of California decided to discuss with parents how vaccines protect children from deadly diseases, something that often gets forgotten in the debate. It had striking results: ‘Highlighting the common belief had a great effect and made parents three times more likely to vaccinate.’ They found common ground, they talked about something on which they could agree with the parents, and then it became easier to move on to the things that had scared those parents in the first place, such as the autism myth.
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#1714299
From what I've read, the largest cause of the increase in measles is a bureaucratic issue a number of years ago, when large groups missed out on their MMR booster. This was never followed up, so that generation are getting to an age to travel, are picking up measles abroad, bringing it back and infecting their peer group. Chances are the individuals don't know they didn't get it.
The anti-vac brigade is fairly insignificant compared to this.
#1714300
cockney steve wrote:Some of us remember the Thalidomide scandal, it's aftermath, the brutal and shameful treatment of the victims by successive governments. not the only instance of malpractice, obfuscation , cover-ups, dishonesty and blatant , hard-faced lying. Is there any wonder that there is a high level of mistrust of the "ruling-classes" by the public in general and the less intelligent/less educated in particular?


That might have held sway if there would have been difficulties in getting vaccination uptake in the beginning, but early on nobody needed to convince any parent that vaccination against Polio, Measles, Rubella etc was a good thing as those same parents came from an era in which their some of their direct contemporaries had died or survived with severe damage as a result of those diseases.

Nope, this is the result of living in a post truth era where everyone is an expert on vaccinations and credence is given to flat earthers.
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#1714303
riverrock wrote:From what I've read, the largest cause of the increase in measles is a bureaucratic issue a number of years ago, when large groups missed out on their MMR booster. This was never followed up, so that generation are getting to an age to travel, are picking up measles abroad, bringing it back and infecting their peer group. Chances are the individuals don't know they didn't get it.
The anti-vac brigade is fairly insignificant compared to this.


Do you have a ref for that.... It's not something I'd heard.....
#1714323
riverrock wrote:From what I've read, the largest cause of the increase in measles is a bureaucratic issue a number of years ago, when large groups missed out on their MMR booster. This was never followed up, so that generation are getting to an age to travel, are picking up measles abroad, bringing it back and infecting their peer group. Chances are the individuals don't know they didn't get it.
The anti-vac brigade is fairly insignificant compared to this.


It’s sometimes easier to track a car’s history than an individual’s medical.

It’s being acknowledged that poor uptake of the 2nd MMR just prior to school age, is the difficulty in getting an appointment that fits in with both parents work hours.

I wonder what the answer could be?
#1714324
Jim Jones wrote:
It’s sometimes easier to track a car’s history than an individual’s medical.

It’s being acknowledged that poor uptake of the 2nd MMR just prior to school age, is the difficulty in getting an appointment that fits in with both parents work hours.

I wonder what the answer could be?


Give the necessary jabs in school, that is what happened when I was a lad and I don'the remember their being any naysayers!
#1714468
I remember the school "jab" sessions and also the sugar-cube carrying a dose of vaccine....This was totally at odds with the same health authority trying to tell us how bad sugar was for our teeth which would all fall out.

I also remember the Spastics society donation -collecting device, which was a model of a child with calipers (stood on a plinth about a metre high in all-usually stood outside bigger shops and carted in at night. It would take a really brazen criminal to uplift one of those and cart it down the street.

for those not understanding, calipers were not-only a pair of arms akin to a set of dividers, used for inside or outside measurement, but in this case, a pair of metal rods extending up the unside-leg and outside-leg of the wearer. They were attached by several transverse straps to which they were attached, thus keeping the leg rigid at the knee-joint to aid walking.
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#1714492
Jim Jones wrote:
It’s being acknowledged that poor uptake of the 2nd MMR just prior to school age, is the difficulty in getting an appointment that fits in with both parents work hours.

I wonder what the answer could be?


Only require the appointment to fit in with either parents work hours ?

Bill H
#1714534
Bill Haddow wrote:
Jim Jones wrote:
It’s being acknowledged that poor uptake of the 2nd MMR just prior to school age, is the difficulty in getting an appointment that fits in with both parents work hours.

I wonder what the answer could be?


Only require the appointment to fit in with either parents work hours ?

Bill H



Possibly, however if you pick your child up from childcare at 6pm, and bed time is 7pm, there’s little time when you have to squeeze in bathing and story time. Weekend opening of clinics, what about the staff work-life balance?

These are the things that bedevil population-wide health initiatives when you want 100% uptake.
#1714602
I doubt very much the parents’ work schedule/timetable is the reason. When your child’s health, indeed life, may depend on these inoculations, you MAKE time for them.
It’s the same old story - when your doctor tells you it is important to complete a antibiotic course, many/most stop taking the pills when they start to feel better, hence the increasing resistance to them.
It took just one doctor in the media to suggest that the combined MMR jab caused some disability in children that the fear set in. Indeed, when I accompanied my D.I.L and grandson to the surgery for his MMR jab, there was that fear within me that there may be a just a tiny grain of truth in it. You worry don’t you ?
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