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#1674458
Bert Presley wrote:There is, apparently, a Japanese verb which means: 'to try out your new sword on a chance passing wayfarer'.

This verb is so incredibly precise: Not any old sword - it has to be your new sword. Not any old wayfarer, but some poor sod who just happens along by chance.

I nominate this verb (whatever it is) as the most untranslateable word ever :D


Apparently the only time a Japanese person might hear the word "tsujigiri" is in a "Samurai Drama" (which is, admittedly, a large percentage of Japanese TV). Nobody says it.
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#1674515
GrahamB wrote:Duende in the Flamenco sense.

What's the meaning in the Flamenco sense? (I know what it means in Portuguese (sprite/elf/pixie) and I guess it's the same in Spanish.)
#1675766
I don't know if there's an English word corresponding to the Swedish "buksvåger". Literally "belly brother-in-law", it's a term for the relationship between two men who've, at different times, had sex with the same woman.

Needless to say, you would look for it in vain in a dictionary. :D
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#1675945
akg1486 wrote:I don't know if there's an English word corresponding to the Swedish "buksvåger". Literally "belly brother-in-law", it's a term for the relationship between two men who've, at different times, had sex with the same woman.

Needless to say, you would look for it in vain in a dictionary. :D


I don't speak Swedish but, given your English translation, I can now see how that Swedish word came about :shock:
#1675972
akg1486 wrote:Literally "belly brother-in-law", it's a term for the relationship between two men who've, at different times, had sex with the same woman.


Imagine being at a party...

Some fat bloke in a Hawaiian shirt decides to talk to you.

But that doesn't stop him chewing on a barbecued chicken leg. Then he wipes his fingers across his chinos before extending a hand in friendship:

'Hi. I'm Ricky. I hear we're belly brothers-in-law...'

Eugh.
#1676005
Bert Presley wrote:
PeteSpencer wrote:Huh?

She's English. :roll:


She is? Really? English? Cripes. Just goes to show that one shouldn't assume.

But an interesting philosophical question arises: Would she be equally as beautiful if she was named Waynetta Wibley?


I have no idea, but after seeing this Sacramento TV interview she did strike me as being quite witty!

Probably not the best start when they introduced her as "Carla".
#1676049
Bert Presley wrote:'Hi. I'm Ricky. I hear we're belly brothers-in-law...'

Eugh.

As you can imagine, that's not how it's used. :D Gossip such as "I heard that the two of them are belly-brothers-in-law" would be more typical. Mind you: not a super-common word. And it does sound really disgusting; not used in mixed company.
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#1676125
an analogous Inuit word is aviliaq . It is sometimes rendered 'co-spouse'. It can encompass a number of relationships, but they generally involve two people of the same sex having (or having had) association with the same third person, usually of the other. A respectable meaning is the relationship of a man with his wife's former and now dead husband; but can also be used of a current love-rival (possibly further implying the cognisance of both).

An interesting (but new to me until I checked for recent online usage) scenario for its use may be for a lesbian couple, unless the implication is that both have previously had an association with the same man (or may still do). It is the title of a fairly recent film by an Inuk director, one of whose more recent films ('The angry Inuk', about the effect on traditional Inuk communities of external and often remote opposition to sustainable seal-hunting) I commend:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alethea_Arnaquq-Baril

[with thanks for the further opportunity for linguistic self-indulgence :) ]
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#1676204
Taking a cue from @kanga , I did some quick etymological research. The most comprehensive dictionary in Swedish mentions "bukbroder" (belly brother) with same meaning. The earliest reference in writing is from 1538. It also mentions the Dutch word "buikzwager": an obvious cognate to "buksvåger" that may have been borrowed to Swedish later.

(This is an amazing forum: we're all amateur, professional, former or wannabe pilots, but there's so much esoteric knowledge out there.)
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