Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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By Rob P
#1660903
Trent772 wrote:Halfords are fine


Indeed, looking for a sub-£500 Hardtail ATB a couple of years back, Halford's house-brand Voodoo Bizango 29" topped most of the reviews for the category. Now with a couple of years on it mostly off-road through Thetford Forest, it was a good call.

Rob P
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By PeteSpencer
#1660904
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:On a different note, if it is to cycle with your grandchildren you are better off with a new light bike for yourself rather than an electric one; non-electric bikers can not keep up with those on an electric bike*

*lycralovers excluded.


That's exactly why I want one: see my first post in this thread.

Are you saying there is no speed control over an electric bike, Halfords or otherwise?

Is it all or nothing, flat out or stopped?

That would seem odd to me.

Peter
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By Flyin'Dutch'
#1660907
Hi Pete,

You do have speed control but the effort between a normal bike and an electric one is such that the electric one sans effort will do 15-20 kph whereas for a normal bike those are speeds which require a big effort.

Don't know the age of the tiddler but when Mrs FD went on an electric bike and myself on a normal bike we found the difference to be too great to go biking together despite me being fairly fit on the bike and having a decent normal bike.

Pretty sure you would find the same - best thing to do is borrow one.
By Mike Tango
#1660917
PeteSpencer wrote:
That's exactly why I want one: see my first post in this thread.

Are you saying there is no speed control over an electric bike, Halfords or otherwise?

Is it all or nothing, flat out or stopped?

That would seem odd to me.

Peter



With an electric bike you control the speed you want to go at in the traditional way with pedal speed and selected gear. The electric motor just assists such that you don’t need the same amount of effort to do so.

In effect if you’re cycling into a headwind or climbing a steep hill, you can adjust the assistance such that both require no more effort than if you were cycling on the flat in calm conditions.

Then, unless you hack the system, the electric assistance will cut out at circa 25kph iirc, which is a legal requirement. Speeds above that you’re on your own!
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By PeteSpencer
#1660918
Just seen a Velosolex on eBay but I guess it wouls be banned from parks and recreation grounds and would need registering with DVLA, insuring etc.

So back to electric bikes.

Trip to Halfords coming on I guess.

Peter
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By Flyin'Dutch'
#1660941
Mike Tango wrote:Then, unless you hack the system, the electric assistance will cut out at circa 25kph iirc, which is a legal requirement. Speeds above that you’re on your own!


Correct - assistance and only op to 25 kph, deemed bike.

Over that they are 'pedelec' they can go up to 45kph, require registration, helmet, insurance and are not allowed on cycleways.
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By flybymike
#1660979
My Brompton is an electric conversion from a bog standard non electric bike, consisting of electric motor in the front wheel hub and a separate “throttle” on the right handlebar. It can be ridden entirely electrically without any pedal assistance, or entirely normally without any motor assistance.
#1661075
The english equivalent to the Solex, was the "Powa-Pak" which took the place of a saddlebag and drove the rear-wheel via a friction-roller.(heavy -duty bike-tyres were available for these! )

Far better, were the ones inside the rear wheel. The Cyclemaster was completely self-contained and the fuel-tank held only a couple of pints.....not a huge problem when it did about 200 MPG :) Though one had to take a can to the petrol-station and buy a half-gallon, mix in the oil (2 stroke) then decant into the tank as needed.

Much more up-market was the BSA Winged-Wheel which was somewhat sleeker and had a remote oblong tank where a carrier would normally be fitted. It's major advantage was the tank being big-enough to take the legal minimum dispense at a petrol-station.

There were many others available, early post-war and the "Corgi" folding paratrooper's machine was a fairly common sight (98cc Villiers power? )-non-availability of tyres killed them off.
Auxiliary cycle-motors,-
No MOT and free road-tax on these machines, now. Insurance will be peanuts. Most are conversions of standard bicycles, though Phillips did a heavy-duty one beefy tyres and wheels and a big mattress-saddle with large chrome underslung springs on each back corner. the crossbar kinked down at the back, allowing a lower saddle-position. still the same cruddy rim-brakes though!

great fun on a sunny day, but too energetic round here. (they were about 25cc )
By IMCR
#1662206
I would suggest having a look at the Bfang kits.

The advanatge is you can choose a bike you like, and fit the motor or have your local bike shop fit it for you.

The Bfang are free of the speed restrictions of all sold as bikes and also have a throttle control if you wish to feel very lazy. (There is no speed restriction off road). They also have the power to go up anything you could ride up, without pedaling at all if you wish.

I fitted mine to two Montague Paratroopers because I wanted a reall good quality folding bike, and had purchased these previousy. It is an awesome result and well worth taking that direction. 40 mile journeys across hilly terrain become an easy reality but you can still excercise as hard as you wish.