Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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#1662912
People who voted leave are a diverse mix from all strata and backgrounds in UK society.

Motives to vote leave were just as divers as that mix was rich:

- Dislike of the EU as an organisation
- Dislike of EU politicians
- Hankering back to 'the good old times'
- Taking the view that the UK would be better off outside the EU
- Concerns about immigration
- Concerns about jobs and job security
- Disliking the Political Elite
- Disliking Call me Dave
etc etc.,

And whatever people's motivations for voting Leave, they are for individuals valid reasons and as such deserve to be respected.

I think it is pretty safe to say there is a higher proportion of racists amongst those who voted Leave than amongst those who voted Remain.

I don't think that the referendum, Brexit and what has followed has changed people into racists or encouraged racism.

What is undeniable though is that since the referendum there has been an increase in racist incidents and casual racism.

I think that is because many racists now think it is acceptable to vent their racist views in (semi) public.
#1662920
The imposition of capital gains tax on houses would straighten the market out quite a bit. France charges it on a sliding scale for the first fifteen years. Housing is affordable. Investors with spare cash tend to put it into industry. Just like we don't.
#1662953
Yes, on one's home. Exactly that. Stay for fifteen years and pay nothing but stay for less than seven and pay 50%.
Fine by me. Keeps housing affordable and reduces churn driven inflation. Stops the grubby speculators as well.
Those who own their houses in France pay for them on seven year mortgages so they do not spend half their working lives paying three times for their homes.
#1662958
tomshep wrote:Yes, on one's home. Exactly that. Stay for fifteen years and pay nothing but stay for less than seven and pay 50%.
Fine by me. Keeps housing affordable and reduces churn driven inflation. Stops the grubby speculators as well.
Those who own their houses in France pay for them on seven year mortgages so they do not spend half their working lives paying three times for their homes.


Fine by you because it fits your circumstances, not so fine if you need to move due to work, expanding family or the need to care for elderly relatives.
#1662959
tomshep wrote:Yes, on one's home. Exactly that.

Maybe individual incomes and savings should just be surrendered to the Govt and a monthly allowance payable? :D

I'm sure there's a few on this thread who would volunteer to form a committee for the purpose of setting allowance levels.
#1662986
Ah, property, housing and planning, my specialist subject. I’m much more in my comfort zone than with lifeboats and immigration policy 8)

JoeC wrote:
Miscellaneous wrote:Equally arguably it is because doing things the way 'we' did (it wasn't easy for me) is not good enough for them as their entitlement is new home, new furniture, new car, new mobile phone, designer clothes and oh must keep up the foreign holidays. :D



That is far from my experience. For the last 15 years I've employed a series of 21 to 30 somethings. None of them have been grasping materialistic self entitlers as you've described. All have been paid a good market rate professional wage yet few of them have been able to afford to buy a house near to the city centre or in the traditional middle class suburbs as I was in their position a decade before. The landscape has definitely changed. It is even more terrible for the unskilled and low waged.

You live in the same city as me Joe. Let’s do the high level analysis for a first time solo buyer in Sheffield earning the average UK national wage of £28,677 which I’m sure is less than the good market rate you pay your professional staff. Let’s remember that Sheffield is much more expensive than the surrounding towns too. Here goes...

3x basic salary = £86,031. Rightmove currently lists 229 homes for sale in Sheffield for less than £80k, including flats and houses. They are all over the city, and in the centre.

A professional couple with say only £50k coming in between them could easily raise a 2.5x salary mortgage of £125k. Rightmove lists 806 properties, including some in very nice areas.

A brand new family house can be bought for less than £130k in Sheffield.

What’s the problem here apart from the unrealistic expectation?
#1662994
Miscellaneous wrote:
tomshep wrote:Yes, on one's home. Exactly that.

Maybe individual incomes and savings should just be surrendered to the Govt and a monthly allowance payable? :D

I'm sure there's a few on this thread who would volunteer to form a committee for the purpose of setting allowance levels.


Isn't that what already happens?

:D
#1662998
Leodisflyer wrote:@eltonioni fine if you want to live in Sheffield!

It was just a sample size of one since Joe's staff seem to have found it difficult to do something that doesn't seem difficult. But using the same £125k budget for a young couple...

Chichester 122 homes currently for sale
Newcastle 1,188
Leeds 610
Bristol 46
London 202
Dover 75
Manchester 680
Carlisle 308

There are plenty of affordable homes in big cities. Even more within an hour's commute, if Joe's people looked next door in Rotherham they would have 559 properties to choose from below £125k. Expectation management seems to be the problem, not affordability or market failure. and there's certainly no need for any bizarre taxation intervention.

(what fantastic thread drift :))
#1663008
tomshep wrote:The imposition of capital gains tax on houses would straighten the market out quite a bit. France charges it on a sliding scale for the first fifteen years. Housing is affordable. Investors with spare cash tend to put it into industry. Just like we don't.


I was intrigued by this as it seemed so restrictive. I've had a quick google (the font of all knowledge) for French Capital Gains Tax and initially I couldn't find any reference to 15 years. Furthermore your principle home is exempt from Capital Gains Tax. But then I found a usful website that explained that the French CGT rules changed in 2012 and put an end to the old "Fifteen-year rule" which had made holiday homes or second homes exempt from CGT if they had been owned for fifteen years or more. The exemption now only applies after thirty years of ownership. This applies to residents and also non residents of France.
#1663011
I've just looked back at our first house on RightMove. We bought it when we were 26 and it was pretty much 3 times our combined salaries at the time. Looking at its last sale in 2017 it is now 5.2 times our combined current salaries (and we both do slightly higher paying jobs then we did back them, relatively speaking).

Much as I liked that first house, it wasn't anything rare or special, so I can't imagine it has some how 'outperformed' the general housing market.
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