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By Bill Haddow
#1705539
nallen wrote:Are the Stephen Yaxley-Lennon supporters currently burning EU flags in Parliament Square engaging in logical thought processes? Just asking …


My news feed (Beeb) is not up to speed on flag burning, but assuming they are, then to answer your question I would say yes, they are engaging in logical thought processes. You may not approve of their thoughts, or their resultant actions, but they are definitely engaging in logical thought processes.

Bill H
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By nallen
#1705542
Bill Haddow wrote:
nallen wrote:Are the Stephen Yaxley-Lennon supporters currently burning EU flags in Parliament Square engaging in logical thought processes? Just asking …


My news feed (Beeb) is not up to speed on flag burning, but assuming they are, then to answer your question I would say yes, they are engaging in logical thought processes. You may not approve of their thoughts, or their resultant actions, but they are definitely engaging in logical thought processes.


You'll have to explain to me how the EU has any bearing on UK contempt of court proceedings. (Or perhaps more precisely in this context, the logical thought processes leading to the belief that the EU has such a bearing.)
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By nallen
#1705546
Miscellaneous wrote:@nallen don't you see the irony in your own logical thinking in presenting a fallacious argument in support of John's claim? :wink:


Not yet, but doubtless enlightenment will dawn eventually. :)
By JoeC
#1705562
I think the greater fallacy is the idea that humans are at all logical.

Some types like to suggest that because they have 'thought' about something that that have Spock-like powers of rationality but this is really just another hubristic human trait that merely masks the little monkey inside throwing **** and playing with itself.
nallen, JAFO, Sooty25 and 1 others liked this
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By Flyingfemme
#1705569
It looks there will be plenty of loopholes to exploit........

Any digital company with revenue of more than €750m - of which at least €25m is generated in France - would be subject to the tax.

Firstly - they need to find out how much revenue a non-resident company actually has.
Secondly - the big companies can simply split functions into smaller companies to lower "revenue" and the proportion generated in France.

It really is a pretty blunt instrument and companies can always choose not to do business in/with France.

The point of the EU is a united front and a consistent application of rules/taxes. It must happen if the "promised land" of full union is ever to work. This hasn't happened to date and there are no concrete plans to make it happen. The whole thing is smoke and mirrors.
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By PaulB
#1705572
Flyingfemme wrote: The whole thing is smoke and mirrors.


It may be but it's got people talking about it..... That's the first step.
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By eltonioni
#1705604
JoeC wrote:Has anyone else read that the French have decided to go it alone and tax the big tech companies?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-48945828

How is this possible if, as is persistently argued here by Brexiteers, that the EU robs member states of their ability to manage their own affairs?


It's just like the way that ROI and Luxembourg are the EU domicile nations of choice for supranational tax planning. Beyond some half hearted VAT measures, corporation taxes are a domestic matter as anyone who pays attention knows, which is why nobody has ever made an issue of it unless they are building a straw man.

Good luck to the French.

Next. :)
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By OCB
#1705639
...EU based (vat) carousel fraud, anyone willing to put a relatively well researched figure on what that’s cost over the past 35+ years?

Last time I had rock solid figures it was in the 10s of billions of Euro.

Member States were well aware of the problems, did the square root of feck all about it.

CAP and CFP were bad enough, but at least they looked after the base industries, and some sort of environmental protection.

Missing trader fraud, I swither t‘win physically sick and boggle eye’d lune when I compare the sheet I go through as an openly honest and ethical business owner, and the disadvantage it puts me against those with a few less scruples than I.

It’s one of the many reasons I’ve said for decades that the EU is doomed when it comes to economic unity with no political unity.
By johnm
#1705643
As things stand the EU is evolving and it's only 40 years old. It's taken the USA 250 years to get to a half **** Federation. As yet in Europe there is no political or economic "unity" there is just growing collaboration and co-operation and as many might recall, youngsters suffer growing pains.


I don't get the logic that says the EU is less than perfect so it's a disaster we should distance ourselves from, the UK is a complete and utter political shambles with ailing public services, but that's either fine and OK or the fault of the EU.

As to Yaxley Lennon's supporters their "logic" would hold just as well if they were burning the stars and stripes or the rising sun.
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By Sooty25
#1705653
The EU has evolved and expanded far too fast. From what it started out as, to where is is now, just too much.

It allows the likes of Luxembourg to harbour corporate tax evaders who tax strip other nations, Amazon being the classic culprit.

Then it finds time to insist veggieburgers can't be called burgers, and electric cars must go "vroom-vroom" while we bankroll it!
cockney steve liked this
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