Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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By johnm
#1674558
eltonioni wrote:Thanks @nallen . From reading that quickly, the same paragraph stood out to me too and Peston is just plain wrong. The ECJ can be asked by the arbiter (which isn't the ECJ) for a ruling on EU law, which is right and proper.

It's up to the UK and Switzerland to ensure that any deal they do together also reflects any other agreements that they have in place with other parties. EU law shouldn't apply directly to an UK/ Swiss agreement unless something's been slipped in.


At the moment the UK’s deal with the Swiss is word for word the Swiss deal with the EU, so there will be work to do in due course, in the meantime we can just carry on as before.
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By eltonioni
#1674559
johnm wrote:At the moment the UK’s deal with the Swiss is word for word the Swiss deal with the EU, so there will be work to do in due course, in the meantime we can just carry on as before.


Not quite: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-a ... ter-brexit
The agreement replicates the existing EU-Switzerland arrangements as far as possible and will come into effect as soon as the implementation period ends in January 2021, or on 29 March 2019 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. It has now been initialled by both countries.

Britain has a major trade surplus with Switzerland, with exports worth £19.04 billion last year. British exports have grown by 41.1% in the last 5 years.
By johnm
#1674560
@eltonioni it might have to replace “EU “ with “U.K.” in a few places :D
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By OCB
#1674567
Interesting article from Soros on the Graun.

“One can still make a case for preserving the EU in order radically to reinvent it. But that would require a change of heart within the EU. The current leadership is reminiscent of the politburo when the Soviet Union collapsed – continuing to issue edicts as if they were still relevant.”

Ouch

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/12/eu-soviet-union-european-elections-george-soros

He’s mucher smartier than me, and did manage to Break the Bank of England, where all I manage to do is bust my overdraft...
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By nallen
#1674569
eltonioni wrote:EU law shouldn't apply directly to an UK/ Swiss agreement unless something's been slipped in.


Yeah, but no, but yeah... It would be possible to construct a scenario in which a three-way UK-EU-CH dispute arises, and the Swiss-CH axis of this ends up with the arbitrator asking for a binding ECJ ruling that ultimately impinges on the UK-CH element. (If such a possibility, however remote, is a red line to you, then you are Jacob Rees Mogg AICMFP.)
By Mike Tango
#1674579
When someone such as Soros speaks I always assume he/they are only trying to influence the story or move the markets in a way that will benefit their own financial interests.

Irrespective of the outcome on the proles.

Bit like most or all of the brexit big hitters really.

OCB wrote:Interesting article from Soros on the Graun.

“One can still make a case for preserving the EU in order radically to reinvent it. But that would require a change of heart within the EU. The current leadership is reminiscent of the politburo when the Soviet Union collapsed – continuing to issue edicts as if they were still relevant.”

Ouch

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/12/eu-soviet-union-european-elections-george-soros

He’s mucher smartier than me, and did manage to Break the Bank of England, where all I manage to do is bust my overdraft...
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By eltonioni
#1674583
Mike Tango wrote:When someone such as Soros speaks I always assume he/they are only trying to influence the story or move the markets in a way that will benefit their own financial interests.

Irrespective of the outcome on the proles.

Bit like most or all of the brexit big hitters really.

Soros is pro Remain, pro second referendum, pro A50 withdrawal, pro anything that keeps the UK in the EU and has been spending millions of his own money on campaigns to keep it that way. ;)
By Mike Tango
#1674592
All for thoroughly altruistic motives I’m sure.

I have my own reasons for wishing remain had one, they are nothing to do with making money for myself off the back of it.
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By Pete L
#1674593
Just a shame he wasn't kind enough to push his cash the other way in 1992. Atonement for being in the same bracket as Farage?
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By OCB
#1674595
So much for the old saying about “you can pick friends” then?

I consistently read what the likes of Soros says. He has form. He is also an outspoken pro Europe advocate.

Yet, he dares say that the recent caretakers of the European ideal are just a tad lacking. Aaargh!! Blasphemy! In for a penny, in for a Euro, right now-no questions asked is what is demanded (otherwise you are a racist etc).

Soros clearly sees the disconnect between politicians and the people. It worries him, it worries many - yet they get ignored, marginalised, belittled, berated, called bigots and racist etc, but it’s just a tad evident it’s a distraction.
By johnm
#1674614
The issues that give voice to the likes of Farage and Trump are national, nor are they confined to the U.K. and the USA.

In the UK they are nothing to do with the EU per se, they are to do with sections of the population feeling abandoned and disenfranchised and looking for scapegoats.

Same issues in various countries, different scapegoats. In the U.K. it’s the EU, in the US it’s Mexicans. In both cases it’s actually home govt failure.
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By eltonioni
#1674667
johnm wrote: ountries, different scapegoats. In the U.K. it’s the EU, in the US it’s Mexicans. In both cases it’s actually home govt failure.


And after we leave, we can fix it instead of giving it away in the faint hope that somebody else does it. I have seen zero evidence that the EU Parliament is more interested in the UK than the UK Parliament, and we know how to get rid of ours if we don't like it.
By johnm
#1674672
eltonioni wrote:
johnm wrote: ountries, different scapegoats. In the U.K. it’s the EU, in the US it’s Mexicans. In both cases it’s actually home govt failure.


And after we leave, we can fix it instead of giving it away in the faint hope that somebody else does it. I have seen zero evidence that the EU Parliament is more interested in the UK than the UK Parliament, and we know how to get rid of ours if we don't like it.


That doesn’t make any sense, the roles of the two bodies are quite different and there has never been anything to stop us fixing our own problems, successive governments have simply failed to do so and encouraged people to blame the EU.

All that will happen after Brexit is that a new scapegoat will be needed and my concern there is that the racist right will be encouraged to find one :pale:
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By Leodisflyer
#1674676
@eltonioni The right wing people that are leading this want a deregulated Singapore city state style economy. Many of the new entrants to British politics come from a hedge fund style of background. Many of the Brexit backers went to Eton and the like. They are about as far as they could be from understanding the culture and challenges in South Yorkshire or the valleys of Wales.

It isn’t much better if you look at the Islington set than run the second largest party.

When Labour was last in power their strategy was to grown l services and financial services and the tax revenue for public spending outside London.

Investing in real bricks and mortar jobs around the country may be something that few of the Brexit backers understand. There is little evidence from the last 30 years that Westminster will invest outside the bottom right corner of England.
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