Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.

Moderator: Flyin'Dutch'

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By Leodisflyer
#1674305
@Mike Tango . Saw that. If only half true then its deeply worrying.

We are chuffed to bits to have a thriving colony of sparrows. 50 years ago they were everywhere. Then they became quite rare round here. Having some biodiversity and having some out of fashion garden planting seems to have helped. Plenty of aphids around when they are breeding and we feed the rest of the year.
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By Leodisflyer
#1674312
kanga wrote:
Leodisflyer wrote:..

Switching to aviation for a moment, there's a fun movie on Netflix, "Hurricane". It's the story of the Polish pilots in the Battle of Britain. I didn't realise that the Polish represented 20% of the RAF's strength in the Battle of Britain. 303 squadron was the highest scoring of the battle. ..
.


.. and the first Poles in action with the RAF were with 501(County of Gloucester) Sqn RAuxAF, before 303 was operational. They replaced 501 Sqn pilots lost in Battle of France. They were, of course, flying Gloster-built Hurricanes with Rotol airscrews. They included an 'ace in a day', Toni Glowacki

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoni_Głowacki

All, of course, illustrated in displays at JAM :wink:


Thank you! Must visit at some point.

There's a sad final line before the credits of "Hurricane". After the war 56% of Brits thought that the Poles should be repatriated. Many of those who did go back were murdered or imprisoned.
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By eltonioni
#1674318
Leodisflyer wrote:
eltonioni wrote:This must have been how it was in 1938 with loads of people saying what a bad idea it would be for vulnerable little Britain to have a war with the powerful Continental power.


Just as well that were allied with other powers and, when some of those succumbed, the Americans entered the war with their economic might. That and a strategic mistake made by one of our key opponents when he turned his focus to the USSR.


You misunderstood me, Others are saying vulnerable little Britain is alone, not me. I think the UK has plenty of friends, especially in the EU27.

eltonioni wrote:This must have been how it was in 1938 with loads of people saying what a bad idea it would be for vulnerable little Britain to have a war with the powerful Continental power.


For the sake of interest and not related to Brexit, I read recently that by the 1943 win in North Africa the tide had turned so that the British government expected the European war to be won by 1948. The USA joined in and accelerated that by 3 years. I'll have a dig around to see if I can find it again and check it's veracity.
By Leodisflyer
#1674321
That would be interesting - thank you.

While we are comparing notes on interesting histories, Jeremy Paxman's books on the English and on WWI are worth a read.
By Leodisflyer
#1674322
By the way, the Ladybird book "The Story Of Brexit" is worth a read for some light relief (there's a Kindle version available). This quote seems pertinent:

"When the Nazis flew over the white cliffs of Dover, Britain fought back bravely, with nobody to help except lots of pilots from Eastern Europe, Canada, Africa, the U.S.A. and the Caribbean. When we cracked the secrets of the Nazi Enigma code machine, we needed nothing but British ingenuity and a Nazi Enigma code machine stolen for us by some Polish spies. We stood alone before. We can do it again — can’t we?

Hazeley, Jason. The Story of Brexit (Ladybirds for Grown-Ups) (p. 55). Penguin Books Ltd. Kindle Edition. "
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By Cowshed
#1674323
eltonioni wrote:For the sake of interest and not related to Brexit, I read recently that by the 1943 win in North Africa the tide had turned so that the British government expected the European war to be won by 1948. The USA joined in and accelerated that by 3 years. I'll have a dig around to see if I can find it again and check it's veracity.


That’s a fascinating hypothesis and one that I hadn’t come across before. I must confess to being somewhat skeptical. Without the manufacturing muscle of the US and their rapidly expanded army it seems to me that using UK and Commonwealth forces only would have taken even longer to trudge up Italy and that the invasion of Northern Europe would have been later and smaller in scale.

This in turn would have mean that the Nazis could focus more resources in the East which would, I suspect, have slowed the Soviet machine but not stopped it. It might have resulted in Soviet forces rolling far further to the West, probably only stopping at the Channel?

[Makes me wonder if those 1943 UK planners weren’t related to the same lot doing Brexit]. :roll:
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By spaughty
#1674328
If I remember correctly, Max Hastings in "All Hell Broke Loose" claims that one of the biggest contributions the US made to shortening the war was to target German synthetic fuel production with their bombers. The Luftwaffe was effectively grounded within a few months.

Nobody on the German side could understand why nobody had thought of that before...
By Bill McCarthy
#1674331
A major turning point and step change was when the Merlin Mustang appeared on the scene acting as bomber escort. Before that, it was a turkey shoot by the hun.
By Cowshed
#1674334
The whole Nazi programme was, amongst other things, an economic basket case - being poor in natural resources they stripped the occupied countries of their people, natural resources and assets. Once things started turning against them, and their occupied territory begun to reduce, they never really had a chance as the resources and manpower arrayed against them was huge. Their only chance was some form of ultimate ‘secret’ weapon which luckily for us never got beyond the V2 (the production of which was made the more challenging by those very same resource limitations).

[Can we get back on topic? This is thread is turning all historical - it even mentioned an aircraft in the last post, which really shouldn't be allowed].
By Bill Haddow
#1674365
Leodisflyer wrote: I didn't realise that the Polish represented 20% of the RAF's strength in the Battle of Britain. 303 squadron was the highest scoring of the battle.



Unfortunately I cannot remember the source, but some years ago I learned how the Polish air force of the late 1930s trained / assessed their fighter pilots (perhaps this was to compensate for the deficiencies in their fighter aircraft fleet.)

Those with cojones softer than tungsten steel need not apply. :salut:

Bill H
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By PaulB
#1674376
The Seaborne deal has collapsed and now EuroTunnel are suing HMG over the ferry contracts.

Eurotunnel's barrister Daniel Beard QC said Eurotunnel only found out "when contract notices were published three days after Christmas".

He said it was "quite remarkable" his client had not been informed given its recent history in running cross-Channel services.

Ewan West, representing Transport Secretary Chris Grayling in court, said the government's procurement process was only for "maritime freight" services and that Eurotunnel "could never have provided that capacity" and "could not have complied" with the terms of the contracts.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47206303

I wonder if Chris Grayling exists so that he can deflect criticism away from other areas?
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By Flyin'Dutch'
#1674378
eltonioni wrote:Presumably Eurotunnel have more ferries than Seaborne and their lawyer counts like Diane Abbott.


@eltonioni If similar happened to your business you would just lean back and be happy with the government?

Irrespective of views on other matters, it must be a concern when the Government acts in such a cavalier manner.

Or?
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