Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.

Moderator: Flyin'Dutch'

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By romille
#1673939
Surely it is in Irish interests to help to find a solution to the backstop problem, if the UK crashes out will that not make Ireland to mainland Europe trade and vice versa very difficult, as I imagine significant amounts goods between the two travel via Great Britain.
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By Leodisflyer
#1673943
The thing is that there is a solution, it’s just that it’s not palatable to the MPs that hold the balance of power.

If the PM had been honest with the electorate and said that she needed a bigger majority in 2017 to head off minority interests in her party then she would have had the majority she needed to come up with a tenable deal.

As it was, the other main party in England went for a strategy of constructive ambiguity and a commitment to a customs union. The electorate rejected hard Brexit rhetoric, UKIP got only 1.8% of the vote and the PM was left severely weakened.
By Nomad63
#1673949
The condition, dubbed Brexit Anxiety Disorder, causes the pro-European middle classes to behave irrationally - so much so, those who fit the profile have been labelled ‘Remainiacs’ by professionals.

Psychologists say these Remainiacs are acting no different than those suffering from chronic anxiety caused by complete loss of control and insecurity, Politico reports.

Dr. Philip Corr, professor of psychology and behavioural economics at the University of London, and Dr. Simon Stuart, a clinical psychologist, say these so-called Remainiacs can be spotted a mile off.

They are, the pair say, prone to anger, despair and rumination and slip into polarised “in” and “out” groups to seek demonisation of Brexiteers.
By Leodisflyer
#1673956
It should be clarified that the Brexiteers that are being criticised are those who campaigned for leave with no plan on how to deliver it safely.

That is very different to criticising those who voted to leave and also another group who campaigned and presented a credible plan.
PaulB, Flyin'Dutch' liked this
By Mike Tango
#1673959
eltonioni wrote:You agree that a reunification referendum is the only way to solve the Irish backstop termination date issue? I'm more than a little surprised. :shock:


Not the only way, no.

But we may be about to force a deeply unwanted and extremely detrimental change on the island of Ireland so I see no reason why that shouldn’t therefore be a catalyst for further possible change on the island going forward.

The referendum opened Pandora’s Box, when the lid eventually closes again what’s left of the UK may look very different to how it looks now.

I hope to be spending some time with former republican activists and prisoners when I’m in Belfast next month, and look forward to hearing their thoughts first hand.
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By eltonioni
#1673965
Mike Tango wrote:
eltonioni wrote:You agree that a reunification referendum is the only way to solve the Irish backstop termination date issue? I'm more than a little surprised. :shock:


Not the only way, no.

But we may be about to force a deeply unwanted and extremely detrimental change on the island of Ireland so I see no reason why that shouldn’t therefore be a catalyst for further possible change on the island going forward.

The referendum opened Pandora’s Box, when the lid eventually closes again what’s left of the UK may look very different to how it looks now.

I hope to be spending some time with former republican activists and prisoners when I’m in Belfast next month, and look forward to hearing their thoughts first hand.


Presumably, after Brexit, NI / Scotland / Wales / Yorkshire separatists would be required to have detailed plans already agreed with the UK Government which comprise more a than Remain /Leave question?

Obviously Yorkshire will always be OK going it alone. King Geoffrey the Everlasting has a nice ring to it.
Last edited by eltonioni on Sun Feb 10, 2019 2:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
By Nomad63
#1673967
Leodisflyer wrote:It should be clarified that the Brexiteers that are being criticised are those who campaigned for leave with no plan on how to deliver it safely.

That is very different to criticising those who voted to leave and also another group who campaigned and presented a credible plan.



Nope, that might well be your criteria, but it's not all about you :D
it should be clarified that the criticism as you call it, is often directed far more widely certainly it is to those that voted leave
By Leodisflyer
#1673971
That’s very unfortunate.

I’ve not seen it, other than I did it difficult to look a person in the eye who I know - he voted to leave purely because his wife told him to. She works for the NHS and apparently believed that voting to leave was necessary to prevent privatisation. I’m sure you’ll understand that when your children are facing an uncertain future, you would hope that people had made an informed choice and not voted purely on somebody else’s say so.

Peter Bone gave the impression that he thinks that Tusk’s criticism was aimed at him.
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By PaulB
#1673975
eltonioni wrote:
PaulB wrote:Oh, I do wish people would cite the things that they quote. It must be the scientist in me....

Is it this one?

https://brexometer.com/britains-middle- ... y-disorder

Full article: https://www.politico.eu/article/brexit- ... yndication

Ouch :lol:


Thx....

It says "Sound familiar?" - actually, no it doesn't (which is not the same as saying it doesn't happen.)
By Leodisflyer
#1673981
Bit of a false premise behind that article. A majority of Labour voters are opposed to Brexit, while a majority of Conservative voters are for it. A very large chunk of the votes for Brexit came from the bottom right corner of England.

The picture that accompanies the article reinforces a lot of stereotypes that don’t map to the wider picture.
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By Sooty25
#1673997
There has been a lot said about what was said during the period between the referendum being announced and the vote itself. Classic example being the £350M on the bus.

What seems to have been ignored is that before all of that, there was sufficient public unrest regarding our EU membership for the Gov't to actually even consider, and trigger a referendum in the first place.

Nobody knows how much the campaigning affected the vote result, the margin to leave may actually have been larger had there been no campaigning at all, but we do know there was significant prior unrest.
By Leodisflyer
#1674002
I agree and a straight vote without the campaigns would have been a lot healthier.

A lot of the concerns have come from the way the campaigns were conducted.

The Syrian refugee poster revolted many and continues to cause concern. Having known one of the people closely linked to it I don’t believe that the poster, as interpreted, represents their beliefs.
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