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By PeteSpencer
#1621338
If any of you have children who want to read medicine, are already at medical school or who are embarking on the career ladder as a’junior doctor’ ( they will still be junior doctors age 38) then this book is a ‘must read’

Even if you are in none of these categories it is a good read for those on here who perpetually moan about their/their relatives bad NHS experiences.

You will laugh out loud, you will cry and if like me you followed exactly the same path nearly 50 years ago (except that I don’t remember calling my speciality of Obstetrics & Gynaecology ‘brats and twats’). you will nod knowingly.

Without meaning to introduce a spoiler you will say ’what a f*cking waste.’

It’s entitled ‘This is going to hurt’ by. Dr Adam Kay pub. Picador ISBN 978-1-5098-5863-7

Available in paperback on Amazon.

Absolutely no connection with the author except to say I was horrified and ashamed that little has changed for junior doctors since the 1970s: In fact things seem a bloody sight worse.

Peter (NHS survivor)
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By Lindsayp
#1621369
I saw that in Waterstones recently and was tempted. Might now get it next time I'm there.

Mind you, saying that junior doctors are getting older, I notice on the sort of A&E reality shows that my wife, bless her, watches, that many consultants seem to be still wearing shorts, ie are very young. I prefer consultants to have white hair and look grizzled from an NHS career or plump on high earnings from private, so is the "reality tv" showing an unreal view?
#1621380
During long laborious steady steaming conditions at sea we often used to break out the BRs ( books of reference) on emergency medical procedures, and other stuff, that may be required since no doctor was carried on board. These were kept in the engineers office (a big cupboard really) in the engine room, for some strange reason. Can you imagine an unqualified person having to open up a crew member to remove an appendix say. The one on tropical diseases was a bit of an eye opener. You don’t want to know how a tooth was removed from a bleating fella who thought that everyone should know of his plight !
By NickS
#1621393
In the absence of a handy Russian ship (who all carried doctors and were generally very helpful when required), I once stitched someone’s hand when the Chief Steward couldn’t bring himself to do it. My only qualifications were a strong stomach and “you were in the Scouts so you must have had to sew on badges”.
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By PeteSpencer
#1621397
Lindsayp wrote:I saw that in Waterstones recently and was tempted. Might now get it next time I'm there.

Mind you, saying that junior doctors are getting older, I notice on the sort of A&E reality shows that my wife, bless her, watches, that many consultants seem to be still wearing shorts, ie are very young. I prefer consultants to have white hair and look grizzled from an NHS career or plump on high earnings from private, so is the "reality tv" showing an unreal view?


You misunderstood:
All hospital doctors in training below the grade of Consultant are known as 'junior doctors'.

Way back when, a junior doctor for the more competitive specialities could expect to be between 38 and 40+ before becoming a Consultant. I was 38 having qualified lateish (due to the requirements of Camb Univ) at age 25.

It took, typically 30,000 hours to train, for example a General Surgeon. Consultants in some specialities were often appointed earlier (anaesthetics, psychiatry), aged 32-4.

Now the training is accomplished in 8,000 hours.
Draw your own conclusions.

Peter
#1621448
PeteSpencer wrote: little has changed for junior doctors since the 1970s: In fact things seem a bloody sight worse.)


Could that be a reason why their humour [ an example of which is in your post] is so much to the fore Pete ?
Similar examples of this gallows type humour is also evident in the Undertaking profession I believe.
Having worked one or two years in the aviation profession , I have seen countless examples of ; downsizing , department re-shuffles , redundancies , 911,,,,,,,,, All of which is very stressful ! ,,,[ask me why I know this]
But what is the vital ingredient of survival in all these situations ? I seem to remember that Readers Digest had a column titled , " Laughter , the Best Medicine" .

Could we survive without it ? Yes , probably we could !

But should such totalitarian attitudes be encouraged ?
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#1621468
Chris Martyr wrote:
PeteSpencer wrote: little has changed for junior doctors since the 1970s: In fact things seem a bloody sight worse.)



But what is the vital ingredient of survival in all these situations ? I seem to remember that Readers Digest had a column titled , " Laughter , the Best Medicine" .

Could we survive without it ? Yes , probably we could !



In my day it was getting rat- ar sed when off duty and cigarettes for some.
But Black Humour was way up there too.

Peter :wink:
#1621469
Lindsayp wrote:I saw that in Waterstones recently and was tempted. Might now get it next time I'm there.

Mind you, saying that junior doctors are getting older, I notice on the sort of A&E reality shows that my wife, bless her, watches, that many consultants seem to be still wearing shorts, ie are very young. I prefer consultants to have white hair and look grizzled from an NHS career or plump on high earnings from private, so is the "reality tv" showing an unreal view?


A & E consultancy used to be a pretty unpopular posting and as a result there were often unfilled vacancies which meant horrendous hours on duty for remaining Consultants.

A couple of appointees at the hospital I used to work left in pretty short order for larger hospitals with less onerous rotas.

The other downside used to be that the A & E consultant just became a 'sorter' and had no say in continuing care of his admissions, a key requirement for NHS job satisfaction.

I understand this has been addressed in recent years, giving A & E consultants responsibility for inpatient beds of their own.
Peter
#1662977
Katamarino wrote:Mention is briefly made in that book of Dr Sophia Webster's flight around Africa in a C182, performing medical training and other work in remote and interesting places. I was her pilot :mrgreen:


Name dropper!

:D
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