For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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#1817816
Stopped off at the new (3rd gen) Supercharger in Crawley today - stonking rate of charge! 179kW is sooooo much better than the 7.4kW I get with the home charger. And the way Teslas can pre-heat the battery prior to arriving at the charger also helps.

My "free Supercharging" is soon to end, so if anyone is on the cusp of ordering a new Tesla, let me know & we can both benefit with 1,000 miles free each. 8) #tart

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Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1817855
Colonel Panic wrote:Stopped off at the new (3rd gen) Supercharger in Crawley today - stonking rate of charge! 179kW is sooooo much better than the 7.4kW I get with the home charger.


7.4! I raise you 2.7!

Can you imagine my delight with our new callbox?

11!

Revolutionised my EV Experience.
Colonel Panic liked this
#1817861
I’ve been reading the blurb on some of these PHEVs - drawn by the 250 mpg claims. Since the battery range quoted is in the order of 40 miles, surely, on a long run, the engine will be running most of the time, and as these engines have a lower cubic capacity are working harder ? There must be a marginal advantage in fuel consumption, if any. Confused dot com.
By rdfb
#1817863
Bill McCarthy wrote:I’ve been reading the blurb on some of these PHEVs - drawn by the 250 mpg claims. Since the battery range quoted is in the order of 40 miles, surely, on a long run, the engine will be running most of the time, and as these engines have a lower cubic capacity are working harder ? There must be a marginal advantage in fuel consumption, if any. Confused dot com.


I believe that car engines are unusual in that they need to deliver extremely high power while the car accelerates, but relatively little in proportion to that while cruising. On a long run, you'll be spending most of your time cruising. The battery will take care of the high power demand of the initial 0-60. After that, a smaller engine is perhaps actually more efficient?
#1817870
It reminds me of the days that the “new” Mini Clubman came out with an advertised 90 odd miles per gallon. The only way that it could achieve that would be ticking over whilst being towed on a trailer !
I’ll scrub round PHEV and EV for now.
#1817873
Bill, I ran a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV for 5 years and a smidgen over 50,000 miles.

I commuted 23 miles each way to work where we had charging facilities. After 2016 in retirement my average daily use dropped to 10 miles/day.

I never logged fuel purchases but could go weeks without refuelling.

So it comes down to need and operational requirements.

My new Pug BEV has around 200 miles range but with Covid I’m recharging once a month on Octopus Go for 5p/hr.
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1817875
Colonel Panic wrote:My understanding of hybrids is that they are designed to save tax, little else.


Originally intended to reduce urban pollution, but yes, they are very much a dead-end in the development of the passenger car

Mercedes promote the very limited electric mileage of their cars with two power sources as being for stately arrival and departure kerbside. Ferrari for boosting ultimate performance when augmenting the ICE

Rob P
#1817878
Rob P wrote:
Colonel Panic wrote:My understanding of hybrids is that they are designed to save tax, little else.


Originally intended to reduce urban pollution, but yes, they are very much a dead-end in the development of the passenger car

Mercedes promote the very limited electric mileage of their cars with two power sources as being for stately arrival and departure kerbside. Ferrari for boosting ultimate performance when augmenting the ICE

Rob P.

Increasingly, electric cars look like a dead end too, as a stepping stone away from oil to to hydrogen power. A ban on new oil powered vehicles by 2030 without any real new subsidies towards electric purchases or infrastructure was telling.

A goodly portion of UK / Earth PLC in general is already set up for converting the transport network to hydrogen, whereas electric is, well, not so much. EV discussions are all about wringing compromises to fit into real world situations. Hydrogen needs no serious compromises for consumers in advanced economies.
Last edited by eltonioni on Mon Jan 04, 2021 9:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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