For help, advice and discussion about stuff not related to aviation. Play nice: no religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
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By kanga
#1911253
Sooty25 wrote:
> Kanga what are your thoughts on the future of the Kaliningrad region?

[with no special knowledge let alone authority, of course :oops: ]

a. the prior ethnic German population fled or was slaughtered (or expelled to East Germany) in the immediate aftermath of VE Day, The survivors in West Germany used to be a significant political force (denounced as 'revanchist, unrepentant Nazis' in Soviet and Russian media), but I believe that their children are less committed to the supremacy of that cause.

b. under the Helsinki Accords (1975), the signatories (including NATO, WarPac and neutrals in Europe) accepted that the then international boundaries were fixed and would be respected by all:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helsinki_Accords

c. Russia claims to be the heir (with associated rights and obligations) of the USSR to all Treaties and Agreements accepted and agreed by the USSR. Note that this is the basis of Russia claims that the actions it has taken to change boundaries within the former USSR are legitimate (or not inherently illegal) because they were not international boundaries at the time of Helsinki.

What this means is that the Konigsberg (as Der Spiegel still calls it, AFAIK) and the rest of the East Prussia ethnic German diaspora cannot expect any of the (heirs to) Helsinki signatories to support any 'right of return' nor 'compensation for loss of property'*. Similarly, the ethnic Russians who now form the vast majority of the Kaliningrad exclave population (transplanted 70-75 years ago from various, sometimes distant and quite possibly less attractive!, parts of the USSR) are unlikely to vote for any change even if given a free choice; and none of the contiguous neighbours (Poland, Lithuania) nor near ones (the other Baltics, Sweden) are allowed (under Helsinki) to challenge its status as a Russian Federation exclave. What the neighbours can do is frustrate the land or overflight access, especially of military equipment or personnel; but sea or air access through or over international waters remains available to Russia.

* I believe some East Prussia descendants have successfully reclaimed some property or compensation for its loss in the Baltics and Poland.

The exclave is said to be one of the most militarised in the world, both in armaments and in garrison!
johnm, Sooty25 liked this
#1911260
It is perhaps more than apparent to Ivan that the international humiliation being inflicted by Boris Johnson's diplomatic overtures in Northern Europe including offers of military support, is just repayment for Ivan's murderous activities in Salisbury.
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By StratoTramp
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1911261
Lots more people publicly calling this a proxy war (I know it's obvious it is).

"The former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO said in a recent interview with the New York Times: “I think we are in a proxy war with Russia. We are using the Ukrainians as our proxy forces”. Since then, several U.S. politicians have confirmed this is a proxy war.

On 2nd May, Democratic Congressman Jason Crow tweeted: “The United States is not interested in stalemates. We are not interested in going back to the status quo. The United States is in this to win it and we will stand with Ukraine until victory is won.”

Speaking to Fox News on May 6th, Democratic Congressman Seth Moulton explained: “At the end of the day, we’ve got to realise we’re at war. And we’re not just at war to support Ukraine. We’re fundamentally at war – although somewhat through a proxy – with Russia. And it’s important that we win.”

Then on May 11th, Republican Congressman Dan Crenshaw tweeted, in defence of his decision to approve the latest $40 billion aid package: “Yeah, because investing in the destruction of our adversary’s military, without losing a single American troop, strikes me as a good idea. You should feel the same.”

Recently seen some footage of simple drones being used to drop mortar shells on Russians troops. It's vicious and a terrible waste. But Russia are clearly the aggressor. Want it to stop. Get out. Go home.

One even went through the sunroof of a car and detonated inside, must have been a complete mess. One of those videos where you think why I am being such a ghoul watching this.

Think it was on that Ukraine Leaks channel, was there from the footage of the bombing run on snake island.

I blame Eltonioni :lol:
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
User avatar
By Rob P
#1911295
Meanwhile, in another impending battle Ukraine look to be certain victors.

The bookies are giving 2/5 on Ukraine for Eurovision.

Rob P
User avatar
By Sooty25
#1911298
kanga wrote:
> Sooty25 wrote:
> > Kanga what are your thoughts on the future of the Kaliningrad region?
>
> [with no special knowledge let alone authority, of course :oops: ]
>
> ...........
>
> The exclave is said to be one of the most militarised in the world, both in armaments
> and in garrison!

Wow, thanks. I had not really got my head around it until you'd "simplified" it.

Up until the start of the conflict my business was UK agent for a manufacturer in Kaliningrad. I guess we still are. Obviously everything stopped quite quickly, but it doesn't erase the relationship you've built with staff or the need to support existing warrenties doesn't.

Understanding the basics of the history does help.

I'm guessing if this conflict gets more global than it is, they will be in for quite a rough ride!
#1911310
Flintstone wrote:
> I was thoroughly confused by all the tanks and rocket trucks and stuff
> driving along.
>
> Where were the tractors that tow them?

Does this help explain things?

[img]https://i.imgur.com/gU7BcnA.png[/img]
User avatar
By Flyin'Dutch'
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1911314
Sooty25 wrote:
Obviously everything stopped quite quickly, but it
> doesn't erase the relationship you've built with staff or the need to support
> existing warrenties doesn't.
>

I'd thought that there is no 'work' to be done warranties or not with the current economic measures?
User avatar
By kanga
#1911318
Today's "Desert Island Discs" with Fiona Hill had interesting (at least to me :roll: ) observations on Putin and Putin's Russia, including from a dinner where she sat beside him (as it turned out, put there precisely because she was deemed by her US - Brookings Institute - employers to look so ordinary that no one would pay her any attention). She had studied Russian only, it seems, because an uncle had been a merchant seaman on Murmansk convoys.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0017435

[There were also 'interesting' things she had to say about the former US President, in whose White House she worked and in whose first impeachment hearing she testified :? ]

She is an impressive character going from being a miner's daughter in NE England (having her accent invite disdain in Oxford) to a being a much respected (and after the impeachment hearings very well-known) academic expert in the US where the same accent, being recognisably British, was treated as an indication of authority :wink:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiona_Hil ... al_advisor)
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User avatar
By Sooty25
#1911392
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:Sooty25 wrote:
Obviously everything stopped quite quickly, but it
> doesn't erase the relationship you've built with staff or the need to support
> existing warrenties doesn't.
>

I'd thought that there is no 'work' to be done warranties or not with the current economic measures?


I can't say to my UK customers "sorry mate, can't support the kit I sold you 6 months ago 'cos of Putin"

I supplied it before the conflict, I need support to honour the warranties. If I make no attempt to support the kit I've sold, 1. It'll all turn up on my doorstep, 2. I lose the customer.

It is not the fault of my customers, me or the small business based in Kaliningrad, that Putin invaded, but there are still problems to fix.

And if this is all over in 6 weeks time, we all need some relationships to survive if the world wants to rebuild.
User avatar
By eltonioni
#1911400
StratoTramp wrote:Lots more people publicly calling this a proxy war (I know it's obvious it is).

"The former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO said in a recent interview with the New York Times: “I think we are in a proxy war with Russia. We are using the Ukrainians as our proxy forces”. Since then, several U.S. politicians have confirmed this is a proxy war.


This is, of course, complete gonads and they should know better than to promulgate carp. Proxy wars... all wars... are executed by the prosecutor, not the defendant and so far Putin hasn't said that the Supreme Allied Commander of NATO, several US politicians and the big boys made him do it.

StratoTramp wrote:
I blame Eltonioni :lol:


:shock:

Can I also take the credit when Putin swings from lamp post before year end? 8)
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User avatar
By PeteSpencer
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1911406
Rob P wrote:Meanwhile, in another impending battle Ukraine look to be certain victors.

The bookies are giving 2/5 on Ukraine for Eurovision.

Rob P


Confirms that Eurovision is nothing to do with musical talent but all to do with petty and not so petty politics.

Any guesses who Cyprus will vote for ?

And rampant anti-British sentiment. :lol:

Edit typo
Last edited by PeteSpencer on Sat May 14, 2022 9:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
By johnm
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1911411
And rampant ante-British sentiment. :lol:


I suppose there will be Celts on the jury and in the audience :D
PeteSpencer liked this
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