Non aviation content. Play nice – No religion, no politics and no axe grinding please.
#1558534
skydriller wrote:
OCB wrote:Interesting point - that "regional" accents aren't understood.

The corollary being that non-regional (hence London/sawf east accents) are in fact universally understood.

Yeah....innit...


:roll:


If you read what I actually wrote I said that my GF didnt understand that particular presenter, not all regional accents. I also said that ANY STRONG regional accent, be it London or Liverpool, had no place in mainstream country-wide broadcasting by the BBC. Despite the prevalence of US TV, many American accents are also apparently difficult to understand on TV too.


I did read what you wrote - understood perfectly - but was just being a tiny bit selective, it's what makes this place "fun" :)

I could get all snowflake and blurt on about your intended meaning about Regional accents - but, as said earlier - I've still not recovered from the early 80s and the unannounced abandoning of "BBC English" :)

I remember like it was yesterday when the main News At Six had news readers all of a sudden not talking BBC English :shock:

On an almost serious note though, I have known highly intelligent and educated professionals who've rarely ventured outside the M25 zone (within the UK) - and are completely convinced that "Landan" English is the only "correct" accent and pronunciation....in fact, everyone else who doesn't speak "Landan" English isn't speaking English at all .... :roll:
#1558541
Bert Presley wrote:The girl on the Trivago advertisement, attractive though she is, drives me nearly sane every time she says 'Chivago'.


Can't agree here: apart from being gorgeous, the way she licks her Antipodean tongue around the word 'praaice' sends shivers (nice ones) up my spine.

Like I said I don't have a problem with regional accents , indeed Steph McGovern, who I think SD is alluding to has a glorious regional accent, perfectly intelligible and she's a bright, quick cookie too.

My favourite, though, is the BBC N Ireland correspondent Chris Buckley: I hang on his every word till I hear him say 'high-avver'.

There's nowt wrong with BBC English : the (now retired) BBC announcer, Brian Perkins , IMHO had the most gorgeous, fruity voice ever....
#1558547
Listen to Dad's Army, there's a range of regional (Highland, Cockney, Welsh) and class (upper class drawl, clipped middle class, working class) accents, but all are clearly understandable because the actors had been trained and practised diction, voice control, and projection.

It is not really the accent that is the problem.

Bill H
#1558570
Grumpy One wrote:Anyone want to take Sally Taylor from BBC's South Today - Pleeeease :clown:


Yeah, but they make up for it with the weather presenter.

I quite like Sally Taylor. Good deal less irritating than some of the national presenters that seemed to have come through the diversity over talent school.
#1558577
Bill Haddow wrote:Listen to Dad's Army, there's a range of regional (Highland, Cockney, Welsh) and class (upper class drawl, clipped middle class, working class) accents, but all are clearly understandable because the actors had been trained and practised diction, voice control, and projection.

It is not really the accent that is the problem.

Bill H


(my italics)

But isn't that just what we are entitled to expect from BBC (other broadcasters are available) News reporters and announcers?

Peter
Last edited by PeteSpencer on Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#1558617
Bill Haddow wrote:Listen to Dad's Army, there's a range of regional (Highland, Cockney, Welsh) and class (upper class drawl, clipped middle class, working class) accents, but all are clearly understandable because the actors had been trained and practised diction, voice control, and projection.

It is not really the accent that is the problem.

Bill H


Exactly, and that is the point I was making, its not the accent, its how the words are spoken.

indeed Steph McGovern, who I think SD is alluding to has a glorious regional accent, perfectly intelligible and she's a bright, quick cookie too.


And yes if it is the same presenter, when she is reading from the script is is obvious she has been trained to speak correctly for her job, but when off script and chatting, she "forgets" this - or reverts to pre-trained natural speech - and it certainly grates - check it out next time she is on, its very noticeable.

Regards, SD..
#1558630
As an (inevitable) aside. I loved the comment on some wireless broadcast or other a while back:

"Neil Nunes. Half man, half sub-woofer"

Rob P
#1558659
In this context I recommend the Gillian Reynolds column in the Radio section of the new (16-22 Sep) RT, entitled 'The speech police'. Too long to reproduce here, even if Copyright allowed, but it ends by asking "would that mean radio DJs who sound like Jacob Rees-Mogg ?" :)

Radio, of course, is different. ISTR Moira Stewart saying that many people had not realised she was black until she moved from radio to TV ..
#1558691
kanga wrote:
PeteSpencer wrote:... (how do you represent a glottal stop on paper?)..


easily enough in Arabic or Hebrew script (other scripts are available) .. :)


Transliterated as an apostrophe. I used to work with Ali Mas'ad. hmmm possibly more a's and glottal stops in that surname.
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