Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

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By Fellsteruk
#1834796
Keep at it. I found they keep reading it and question banks like ppl tutor or ppl ground school helped lock it in.

However after so long no thinking of flying I fear some may not have been as locked in as I thought.

Op procedures was really hard for me as it was just sooooo boring and I found it hard to stick but keep at it your smash it I’m sure.

Practice makes perfect.
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User avatar
By leiafee
#1834821
editmonkey wrote:So Air Law... it's much more interesting than I was expecting but how the heck do you get it to stick to the brain matter?


My favourite method for rote learning (which things like Air Law rather than practical subjects basically is) is spaced repetition and active recall. The method...

  • Summarise into a diagram or bullet points with reference to the notes.
  • Cover the diagram/list and remove the notes.
  • Recreate from memory. Make an attempt even if you’re not sure. This bit’s important. This is the “active recall” which physically reinforces those links in the brain by moving things between working memory and long term storage.
  • Return to textbook to check yourself.
  • Repeat the cover-write-check until you can do it.
  • Wait an hour. See if you can still reproduce it from memory (you won’t be able to and you’ll feel cross because “you only read it an hour ago”. This is normal. Try anyway.)
  • Correct from notes.
  • Try again after another hour. Repeat
  • When you can do it from memory an hour later, leave it a day. You’ll need corrections again.
  • When you can do it from memory at a day leave it a week.
  • Once you can do it at a week leave it two (or keep going until you can do it with enough space that you won’t forget before the exam...

What you’re doing is “topping up” your memory at approximately the same rate as it fades.
User avatar
By T6Harvard
#1834838
Excellent advice @leiafee . May I add a couple techniques I have always used...

Read key things aloud. That way you see it AND hear it.

Last time I studied for anything I remember thinking that my dog should be able to pass the exams because she'd heard all my revision :lol:

Make 'flash cards' (you may be too young to have encountered those?) - I write key formulae, airspace rules, definitions, etc on an index card and will randomly pick a few to recall , read topic on reverse, define to myself, turn card over to reveal correct answer. If wrong, turn it over again and rehearse. Very like Leiafee's reveal and recall. I use different coloured cards to enhance visual recall :)

Basically, at my age I'll try anything. I used to have excellent recall...but I can't remember when that was :lol:
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By JAFO
#1834843
editmonkey wrote:So Air Law... it's much more interesting than I was expecting but how the heck do you get it to stick to the brain matter?

Loving Principles of Flight which is logical and intuitive, but I'll be buggered if I can remember what info is included in a Certificate of Maintenance Review :lol:


I'm glad I passed when PoF was just about Bernoulli's and the Chicago Convention was still current affairs. I'm not sure I'd ever get a licence if I started today.

On the flash cards point that @T6Harvard brought up, somewhere I've actually got a pack of playing cards with PPL theory printed on them so you can play patience and just read the cards as you go.
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By leiafee
#1834855
T6Harvard wrote:Make 'flash cards' (you may be too young to have encountered those?) - I write key formulae, airspace rules, definitions, etc on an index card and will randomly pick a few to recall , read topic on reverse, define to myself, turn card over to reveal correct answer. If wrong, turn it over again and rehearse.


Physical flashcards are good for definitions yeah. I’ve used those with shoeboxes for things I’m revising at hourly, daily or weekly, longer intervals and move them between boxes once I “get it” in combo with the spaced rep method.

I’ve done the endless endless tech exams at various jobs that way.
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User avatar
By editmonkey
#1834910
leiafee wrote:
editmonkey wrote:So Air Law... it's much more interesting than I was expecting but how the heck do you get it to stick to the brain matter?


My favourite method for rote learning (which things like Air Law rather than practical subjects basically is) is spaced repetition and active recall. The method...

  • Summarise into a diagram or bullet points with reference to the notes.
  • Cover the diagram/list and remove the notes.
  • Recreate from memory. Make an attempt even if you’re not sure. This bit’s important. This is the “active recall” which physically reinforces those links in the brain by moving things between working memory and long term storage.
  • Return to textbook to check yourself.
  • Repeat the cover-write-check until you can do it.
  • Wait an hour. See if you can still reproduce it from memory (you won’t be able to and you’ll feel cross because “you only read it an hour ago”. This is normal. Try anyway.)
  • Correct from notes.
  • Try again after another hour. Repeat
  • When you can do it from memory an hour later, leave it a day. You’ll need corrections again.
  • When you can do it from memory at a day leave it a week.
  • Once you can do it at a week leave it two (or keep going until you can do it with enough space that you won’t forget before the exam...

What you’re doing is “topping up” your memory at approximately the same rate as it fades.



Fab, thanks for this leiafee!
User avatar
By akg1486
#1835153
Paul_Sengupta wrote:Maybe at least Air Law before she goes solo.

Image

The video said the dog was looking for a new home. I wish I could take her.

On Topic (learning air law): some of what you learn in Air Law and Operational Procedures you'll never hear of again, other things will be embedded in your brain forever and be useful when planning and/or flying. It's surprisingly hard to tell the difference (as a students), so general study tips for "how to learn stuff" are a good idea. There are tons of books and web sites on that subject; the tips already mentioned here are quite good. When you get close to the test, sample questions are very useful.
User avatar
By editmonkey
#1838719
So I *almost* have my class 2 medical. Everything went great and in the clear apart from a minor ailment back in 2019 which my AME requires a doctor's report for, to state that I'm no longer being treated for the condition.

Unfortunately we've moved house since then and my new GP's surgery are being less than helpful - understandable given their current workload - but the receptionist responded to my request like I was asking for a massage and a haircut. Said the doc 'might' be able to do this but unlikely.

Anyone else come up against this? I had a great relationship with my old doc but guessing now they've passed the medical records on he won't be able to help.
User avatar
By T6Harvard
#1838746
Oh no!

You are entitled to a copy of your records under Data Protection legislation (see https://ico.org.uk/your-data-matters/yo ... your-data/ )

So maybe ask for a copy, just of the relevant part of your notes, and ask your old GP to look over them and give a (short) report. Do you think he/she would be willing?

Maybe @flyingdutch will be able to advise what you can do if neither Doc will oblige?

Good luck!

Looks like I need to think about booking my medical, School just confirmed my lessons are indeed on for next week :mrgreen:
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User avatar
By Fellsteruk
#1838751
If the GP is getting funny put it in writing, ask for a sar “subject access request” they have 30days to provide your data from the day they get it if they fault to adhere you can go to the ICO.

Another option I’m currently fumbling through, install the NHS app and setup everything so you can access your full medical record.

You’ll have to get the GP to do something on their side but it’s easy enough although a lot of hoops to jump.

That said not sure how much or how little info is in your “full” history.
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User avatar
By leiafee
#1838768
editmonkey wrote:Anyone else come up against this? I had a great relationship with my old doc but guessing now they've passed the medical records on he won't be able to help.


To get a letter for the medical for cadets I did. Asking them how much it cost did the trick!

(It was about 20 quid as I recall)
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