Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

Moderator: AndyR

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By editmonkey
#1830965
Here’s my first stoopid question:

I can’t quite get my head around the ASI and why a blocked pitot would indicate a higher IAS. Is it simply that the trapped pressure in the capsule will be expanding against decreasing static pressure outside the capsule like a deflated balloon inflating in a vacuum?

If so does that mean the degree of false IAS reading would depend on the airspeed (and therefore trapped pressure) at the time the pitot became blocked?
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By lobstaboy
#1830972
You're on the right track, but it needs a bit more to get the whole picture.
Yes the ASI indicates the difference between the pressure in the pitot tube and the static - using a bellows and with the dial calibrated to read knots or mph etc.
If the pitot is blocked but the static still open, then
- changing airspeed won't affect the reading because the pressure in the pitot can't change because of the block. The ASI appears frozen.
- but if you descend or climb, without a change in actual airspeed, then the static pressure will increase or decrease (just as it does in the altimeter) which will cause a mistaken reading because the difference between the pitot pressure (which is fixed because of the block) and the static, changes. So climbing will give you the situation you describe, descending gives you the reverse.
I find it helps to draw myself a diagram. And remember this is physics, not magic, so it's easy and logical if you think it through carefully.
HTH
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By editmonkey
#1831007
Got it, it just clicked in my head - thanks for that! So the bellows will have a fixed (stuck) pressure and will expand or contract (and give a false reading) as the external static pressure changes with increasing/descreasing elevation.

Yes... my undergrad physics books are getting a dusting off this weekend. Next up angular momentum and precession! :)
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By Rob P
#1831027
Now, the "Learn R/T" course I mentioned earlier.

To get the required licence to operate a glider radio the pilot has to pass the same exam as the rest of us.

The course material is 2021 up to date, and whilst glider-centric is in my opinion as a coach on the course, excellent. There's one or two bits I'd argue with, but nothing significant.

Part one is here:



You will be able to find the rest yourself.

Rob P
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By ErtugrulBey
#1831424
Hi, I plan on becoming a commercial airline pilot and I was planning on applying to flight school after university (I'm going in September), however I'm now considering getting my doctorate so that'd mean I'd finish my education at 26 and by the time I begin my flying career I'll be 27-28 and I'm worried that it might be a bit late and my career progression will be significantly delayed. Furthermore I have other major plans scheduled for around this time that would affect my career (assuming they do go according to schedule but they most likely won't). I already have my PPL and my flight school also have IR and CPL courses too, so I was wondering if I could perhaps train to get my ATPL whilst at uni as I have with my PPL? I've looked at modular courses but it seems like each section is done in 22 week blocks which I wouldn't be able to do, does anyone have any advice for me?
Thanks in advance!!
Shakib
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By lobstaboy
#1831461
ErtugrulBey wrote:Hi, I plan on becoming a commercial airline pilot and I was planning on applying to flight school after university (I'm going in September), however I'm now considering getting my doctorate so that'd mean I'd finish my education at 26 and by the time I begin my flying career I'll be 27-28 and I'm worried that it might be a bit late and my career progression will be significantly delayed. Furthermore I have other major plans scheduled for around this time that would affect my career (assuming they do go according to schedule but they most likely won't). I already have my PPL and my flight school also have IR and CPL courses too, so I was wondering if I could perhaps train to get my ATPL whilst at uni as I have with my PPL? I've looked at modular courses but it seems like each section is done in 22 week blocks which I wouldn't be able to do, does anyone have any advice for me?
Thanks in advance!!
Shakib


Ok I'll bite...
If I understand correctly, you are considering doing a degree course at university at the same time as your ATPL training? That really just isn't humanly possible.
If you really and truly are sure you want a career as a commercial pilot (leaving aside whether that is a good idea right now) then why go to university? Or, go to university and enjoy that for what it is, then, when your thinking has matured a bit more, you'll still have time for the flying career. Be patient, 28 really isn't very old :)
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By Nero
#1831486
editmonkey wrote:Hey Scott, nice to meet ya. Looking forward to getting back into it?
You too.

I sure am. I keep looking at the rare flying GA planes in envy

Not long now, gang!

~ Scott
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By ErtugrulBey
#1832030
lobstaboy wrote:
ErtugrulBey wrote:Hi, I plan on becoming a commercial airline pilot and I was planning on applying to flight school after university (I'm going in September), however I'm now considering getting my doctorate so that'd mean I'd finish my education at 26 and by the time I begin my flying career I'll be 27-28 and I'm worried that it might be a bit late and my career progression will be significantly delayed. Furthermore I have other major plans scheduled for around this time that would affect my career (assuming they do go according to schedule but they most likely won't). I already have my PPL and my flight school also have IR and CPL courses too, so I was wondering if I could perhaps train to get my ATPL whilst at uni as I have with my PPL? I've looked at modular courses but it seems like each section is done in 22 week blocks which I wouldn't be able to do, does anyone have any advice for me?
Thanks in advance!!
Shakib


Ok I'll bite...
If I understand correctly, you are considering doing a degree course at university at the same time as your ATPL training? That really just isn't humanly possible.
If you really and truly are sure you want a career as a commercial pilot (leaving aside whether that is a good idea right now) then why go to university? Or, go to university and enjoy that for what it is, then, when your thinking has matured a bit more, you'll still have time for the flying career. Be patient, 28 really isn't very old :)


Essentially, but I was thinking of spacing it out over several years and perhaps doing one or two lessons a week so it wouldn't be so strenuous but I'm not sure if that's how it works... I have seen that schools such as L3 allow for students to do a degree alongside the ATPL course but I'm not really sure what that entails; they have another course where you can do the ATPL and get a degree in aeronautical engineering (my chosen degree) at Middlesex which I would've applied for but I didn't really want to go to Middlesex since their engineering course isn't that great.

I was planning on going to flight school immediately after sixth form but I thought it would be wiser to go to uni so I'd have a degree to fall back on later should I decide to not go through with the flying and COVID made the decision a lot simpler since there probably won't be demand for any new pilots for quite some time. I'm also really interested in engineering and given that I've now had an idea for a piece of research that I could do for my doctorate, I'm more committed than ever to go to uni. That's true I guess but there are some other life things that my parents want to have happen during that time, I'd rather not get into it but it sort of affects a lot of my future decisions, hence my slight concern
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By editmonkey
#1832052
lobstaboy wrote:
editmonkey wrote:...Next up angular momentum and precession! :)


:)
Well in that case you're ready for the Coriolis Effect in metereology...


Ha!

I mean I knew flying involved a lot prep but I’ve just slogged through ‘Flight Performance & Planning’ and... how does anyone ever get airborne??

Between the flight computer, graphs, tables, figuring out the weights, balances, distances, wind factors, contingencies, and then actually flying and navigating it must take days to plan, and then how do you actually fly when you’re constantly having to calculate and navigate. I’m getting task overload just reading about it :shock:
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By T6Harvard
#1832057
Ha, ha! I like the planning :)

I haven't dared open the Nav book yet! That is the thing I fear most..... being (temporarily) unsure of position :lol:
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