Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

Moderator: AndyR

#1777737
Still studying Pooleys.....awaiting second lesson!

I've had an experience flight: stick time - gentle turns, gentle climb, no rudder work.

I've had one proper lesson : stick time - turns with rudder, climb and descend. I was also allowed to follow through on approach to land.

It ocurred to me that I may find it very beneficial to see and be talked through an entire flight while concentrating on what the FI does, rather than concentrating on what I should try and do. A master class, if you will. OK, there are Youtube vids, but feeling it while seeing it done properly, with explanations as we go, may set me up well?

Is this OTT prep??
#1777739
^Go with the tried and tested training program of your FTO.

You won't have the capactiy to assimilate everything done by FI or gain any benefit from that.
AndyR, T6Harvard liked this
#1777742
It wasn't unheard of for other students to join us on lessons - and vice versa. The instructor would say "Can Dave (other people were available) come with us today?" and off we went. I think I must have had about 3-4 or so with me over the PPL course? I once or twice sat as a passenger as well. Well worth doing. Like you said, gives a different perspective; useful to see things 'from the outside'.
If you fly with another student you may not see things being done to a professional standard, but if it is not good enough, the instructor will comment on it - all of which may be more useful than seeing a perfect demo?
I cannot have cared too much about it - I seem to not have made any notes of it in my logbook!
CherokeePete, T6Harvard liked this
#1777746
Agree with both the above. You would get more from sitting in on someone else's lesson. Preferably some at a similar stage of learning to yourself. When you are flying yourself, you can get a sort of tunnel vision. Watching someone else gives you a wider perspective.
T6Harvard liked this
#1777747
Your early lessons will consist of a ground briefing, followed by a flight where the instructor will demonstrate the manoeuvre, followed by you repeating that. Often more than once until you are proficient enough to move on. Bite sized chunks if you like. Anything else may be overkill..

However, take every opportunity to get airborne that you can. But don’t view it as a lesson, just as a beneficial oversight.

Your instructor will progress you as they see fit.

Lots of background reading will help tremendously. However, try not to get too far ahead, the first few lessons will be the basics. They are essential basics and will form the basis/building blocks of your future flying career, whether that be private or commercial.

When looking at a pilots past flying, I always check the first page. If they’ve spent an hour on each of the ‘building block’ lessons they tend to be better handling pilots. (Generalisation but often very true).

Enjoy.
T6Harvard liked this
#1777753
Morten wrote:It wasn't unheard of for other students to join us on lessons - and vice versa. The instructor would say "Can Dave (other people were available) come with us today?" and off we went. I think I must have had about 3-4 or so with me over the PPL course? I once or twice sat as a passenger as well. Well worth doing. Like you said, gives a different perspective; useful to see things 'from the outside'.
If you fly with another student you may not see things being done to a professional standard, but if it is not good enough, the instructor will comment on it - all of which may be more useful than seeing a perfect demo?
I cannot have cared too much about it - I seem to not have made any notes of it in my logbook!


I found sitting in on another student's lesson very helpful during the Nav part of training. It was a lot easier to follow the map and use the techniques when not distracted by having to fly at the same time
T6Harvard, Grelly liked this
#1777762
As Andy rightly points out in the early lessons with specific exercises every flight is a demo flight, but you assimilate each component in turn.

Flying as a passenger with others in a suitable aircraft is good too for help in consolidating understanding. I spent a fair bit of time in the back seat of a Warrior in my early days and carried others in return.
T6Harvard liked this
#1777765
Flying with someone who knows what they're doing aids learning through osmosis as much as demonstrating the ease of doing stuff, the need to always be doing stuff, the preparedness and readiness to do other stuff as required, how being ahead of the aircraft at all times is down to planning, practice and skills learned through both.

Don't be dissuaded, it's time and money invested in your future flying.
:cyclopsani:
T6Harvard liked this
#1777783
Thanks All.

I am based in Cheshire, Wicksay. Flight experience was at Duxford, flying lesson was abroad (I pursuaded MrT6 to come for a scenic flight while the FI dealt with my lesson 8) ).
Not been able to visit potential schools yet but have ruled out Barton (too busy, complicated airspace all round), I have a couple of places within range. Can't wait to go and visit and speak to folk to get the feel of the places.
Someone previously suggested Sleap, I am aware of Tatenhill (probably my nearest), but Harwarden no longer has a school, although as Airbus is less busy now, who knows what may happen there?

I realise that recommendations might be difficult just now, given the uncertainty hanging over most training organisations, but any pointers or warnings gratefully accepted. For clarity, I have no intention of pre-paying for a bunch of lessons, have read too many tales of woe.

I have already picked up loads of info from this forum and am very grateful for people taking the trouble to post.
CherokeePete liked this
#1777795
Not much to add other than there's a definite 'buzz' around Sleap. Somewhere I'm always happy to visit.

Rob P
Charles Hunt liked this
#1777806
I'm not local, but I would recommend checking out a few schools / clubs. You'll be investing in a lot of time and money there so worth getting one that fits what you want, that you'll get on with. Some will likely have a more social club like atmosphere, some will be very much a school churning out people with PPLs, some will have newer or a wider selection of aircraft, some a single aircraft (so what happens when its in for maintaince?), some may have a single instructor, others you could end up with multiple instructors.

Oh - and don't pay for many lessons up front unless backed by a credit card, or its money you are happy to lose - places that give big up front payment incentives tend to be tighter on cash flow so are more likely to go bust. One big repair bill might be enough to push them over the edge, with them taking your money with them.

Hopefully CV19 restrictions will start to lift so you can get flying again!
#1777890
T6Harvard wrote:Yes, but I am worried that the buzz is in fact a whapp, whapp from the nearby Chinooks?!

No Chinooks at Shawbury, but plenty of Junos and Jupiters!

Having said that, they all broadcast ADS-B, and Shawbury do a great LARS service during weekdays.