Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

Moderator: AndyR

By T6Harvard
#1776152
I'll check out the video, Cessna571, thanks very much.
I did a fair amt of reading of Pooley's Principles of Flight just before my first lesson and recall the 16° AoA being crucial! I have allowed the PoF info to percolate for a couple of months while focussing on Air Law and Human Factors. I learn better by intense study, go away, come back, refresh. Somehow things quietly sink in.

Thank you.
User avatar
By David Wood
#1776231
T6Harvard wrote:
Also, what single piece of advice would help us newbies to stay safe / to not frighten our instructors?


My single piece of advice: take your training seriously and approach it as professionally as you can - even if leisure flying rather that professional flying is what you aspire to.

One of the things that is very frustrating for an FI is the student who turns up for each lesson having clearly given no thought to the lesson before leaving the house. It is hugely important to have read ahead in the book, and to have 'your head in the game', as they say, before you arrive.

One of the reasons why I find women so much more professionally satisfying to teach than men is that [alert: gross generalisation follows] in general then tend to be more diligent than men in preparing themselves for lessons; they tend to be more willing than men to admit that they don't understand and then ask for clarification; and they tend to be more inclined than men to follow the instruction.

Of course that's a gross generalisation. I've had great male students and awful female ones too. But the point I'm making is that if you are expecting your FI to diligently and professionally instruct you, then your part in the deal is that you diligently and professionally interact with that instruction. It's an attitute of mind, not a skill.
T6Harvard, defcribed liked this
By T6Harvard
#1776333
David Wood, may I just ask where you instruct? 8) I totally get what you are saying. I am a bit of a girlie swot, I want to know what to expect, to get some sort of understanding, before I turn up. I'm more than aware that I currently know next to nothing but I sure as heck want to know more and any endeavour I undertake I do it 'for real', no messing about! So, you up for teaching me then :lol: ?
User avatar
By defcribed
#1776421
David Wood wrote:[One of the things that is very frustrating for an FI is the student who turns up for each lesson having clearly given no thought to the lesson before leaving the house. It is hugely important to have read ahead in the book, and to have 'your head in the game', as they say, before you arrive.


One of the more memorable conversations with my instructor during my PPL training went like this:

Her: I really like how you're prepared for each flight and are very switched on in terms of what we're doing next - this makes you easy to teach.

Me: Thanks, but this is costing almost three quid a minute - I'm not going to turn up unprepared!

Her: Most do.

Me: You're kidding?!
T6Harvard, scd975 liked this
User avatar
By David Wood
#1776440
But, given the cost of learning to fly, I am often amazed how little investment some students make in their own learning. And it can be a real dilemma for the FI. I (like most FIs, I'm sure) want to provide the very best, most effective, most enjoyable, best bang-for-the-buck, teaching trip that I can deliver for my student. But I also need to do so for the next student who is turning up in 120 minutes time.

And so when you get a student who turns up late, or who cheerfully announces that, 'No, they haven't read Ex 10 in the book but they're sure that they'll be OK' it leaves one with four unpalatable choices. 1) spend more time pre-flight briefing what the student should have learned already, and thereby risk running over into the next student's slot or cutting short the flying; or 2) go ahead and deliver the lesson without making any additional allowances for the student's lack of preparedness, and risk wasting time in the air; or 3) teach something else; or 4) tell the student to go away, read-up on the lesson, re-book a slot and try again!
T6Harvard, AndyR liked this
User avatar
By Irv Lee
#1776445
David Wood wrote:I teach in the South West, at Compton Abbas in the main. Although at the moment they are closed of course, planning to re-open soon, I understand.

And to paraphrase Mrs Merton, what was it that first attracted you to that aviation-encouraging hive of beautiful ladies, fantastic scenery, and wonderful food??
skydriller, T6Harvard, AndyR and 1 others liked this
User avatar
By GrahamB
#1776446
David Wood wrote:tell the student to go away, read-up on the lesson, re-book a slot and try again!

The trouble with that option, of course, is that your name would be mud all over social media, with people whinging about 'being a customer'!

Option 5) is probably to go ahead with the lesson, followed by a short discussion about what you expect from the student by way of preparation in future if their and your time isn't going to be wasted, and if it happens again they need to think carefully about whether they really want to continue with you.
T6Harvard liked this
User avatar
By David Wood
#1776455
Irv Lee wrote:
David Wood wrote:I teach in the South West, at Compton Abbas in the main. Although at the moment they are closed of course, planning to re-open soon, I understand.

And to paraphrase Mrs Merton, what was it that first attracted you to that aviation-encouraging hive of beautiful ladies, fantastic scenery, and wonderful food??


Well, all three, of course! And actually, strangely, it was also where I learned to fly many many moons ago.
T6Harvard liked this