Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

Moderator: AndyR

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By Rob P
#1769490
A le Ron wrote:For C of A, you'll do well to keep it below 8K a year, excluding engine/prop replacements.


That sounds a bit high as a generalisation.

Though a few years out of touch with him, the Shiny Colt, a CAA aircraft, generally came in at somewhere between £2,500 and £3,500.

Rob P
User avatar
By Rob P
#1769572
I'd assume not.

You'd have to add another £1,500/£2,000 to account for that. But I now realise I misread the post. The cost I quoted was for the once a year major maintenance.

Overall costs for the Colt were in the region of £5,000. Hangarage / Insurance / Maintenance.

Rob P
#1769578
My figure was based on the 4 aircraft I’ve owned, all C of A, and include hangarage and insurance in the north of England. The current steed costs more. The C150 was sometimes less. But not always.
#1769618
Certificate of Airworthiness. Just means it’s certified.

The alternative is uncertified “permit to fly” often abbreviated to permit aircraft. These permits are issued by LAA or BMAA on behalf of the CAA, or the CAA directly, or EASA.
#1769637
A le Ron wrote:Forget the purchase price. It's just a bond that is repaid when you sell the aircraft. The only relevant costs are the running costs. For C of A, you'll do well to keep it below 8K a year, excluding engine/prop replacements. Permit can be flown for rather less.

Meh. Not all C of A are that costly. Mine isn't and if it were I'd probably have got rid of it years ago. I haven't costed it in recent years but probably around 30 - 35% of your figure.
ps. that's including hangarage.
#1769651
carlmeek wrote:Certificate of Airworthiness. Just means it’s certified.

The alternative is uncertified “permit to fly” often abbreviated to permit aircraft. These permits are issued by LAA or BMAA on behalf of the CAA, or the CAA directly, or EASA.


But the important point in considering first ownership is the cost and operational implications.

Sweeping generalisation:

CoA expensive, gold plated, limited work you can do yourself. Cessna Piper Etc

Permit, less expensive, you can do more stuff yourself. Rans Vans, Jodel etc,
#1769661
Regarding hangarage costs, when I used to base at the local regional hangarage was charged on aircraft weight, cannot now remember if empty or AUW. Mine was in the lightest category, hence cheapest, but also took up most floorspace. I did not complain or question the logic.
#1770109
Get 3 like minded fellows, or fellowesses, together, chuck 20k each into the pot and get a really nice, well equipped, economical LSA.

Miscellaneous has all the details....... :pirat: :thumleft:
t1m80 liked this
#1770756
It seems that hangarage is somewhat more expensive further south.
In Scotland on a farm strip I have my aircraft only in a hangar at £100 per calendar month.
Sole ownership, own maintenance, my Emeraude runs on premium mogas from cans.
Over the 12years I’ve owned it.
Initial cost 16k.
Two replacement cylinders, £1000.
Carburettor £600.
Magnetos £1500.
Tyres, tubes, tailwheel assembly £1000.
8.33 Radio £1000?
Various cosmetic improvements and general fettling at pocket money prices.
All of which fitted by me with grown up sign off/supervision.
Permit aircraft is the only way that I would consider, especially being on a pension.
mick w, AndyR liked this