Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

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By Miscellaneous
#1727156
What I'm suggesting, @Jazzer, is that they are very different activities which for me are not comparable to each other. They offer very different experiences and rewards. Of course you have to try to determine which floats your boat, however they are sufficiently different for both to float your boat equally. :D

All in my opinion, of course. :D
By David Smeaton
#1727225
I looked at all 3 but discounted gliding for many of the reasons already stated.

It was then between PPL (or LAPL) and the NPPL. I had a trial lesson in both a PA28 and a C42 Microlight and looked at what I would want to do afterwards. On the basis that I wanted this as a hobby mainly for local flights, the NPPL route worked best for me.

The cost was also an important factor. The PA28 was working out at around £190 per hour (including landing fees) and the C42 £130 (grass strip so no landing fees for club members). The minimum hours is less for the NPPL, although no one passes in the minimum anyway, so this is a moot point! The NPPL only requires 5 exams and not 9 and can be flown on a medical declaration and not a type 2 medical. When you are older, like me, these are all important factors. Finally, hiring the plane afterwards is also significantly cheaper on a Microlight.
By PeterMa
#1727233
I've been seriously considering going back to gliding as interest in power flying has dropped hugely for me in the last few years.

The challenge that flying ( and staying flying ) with no engine poses was for me one of the biggest 'highs' from flying , the difference in launch options dramatic ( head snapping winch acceleration , or formation on the tug , or even a bungy launch with a huge rubber band! )

it is an immersive way of flying - truly only possible with others input ( mostly voluntary I'd add), for a full day or weekend at a time in what I still feel are some of the most graceful & efficient machines ever made .

In gliding you have to get it right , no go around , second approaches etc. ( unless you've got a small motor) .

I'm selling it back to myself more & more ….!
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By Jazzer
#1727237
Gliders are indeed beautiful machines. Watching wave soaring videos on YouTube is like the view you get in an airliner. On the other hand the Eurostar microlights look like a whole lot of fun and somewhat cheaper than a Cessna or piper.
By Spooky
#1727431
If I could do it again I’d just do the PPL straight off. Now the progression system has gone (NPPL-LAPL-PPL) I think unless you definitely want to fly microlights and no more, you might as well go straight for the PPL which gives you more options such as quick conversion to microlights, progression to commercial should you desire.
By Jazzer
#1727529
I'm going to book a trial Eurostar flight (90 mins £199) and a trial glider flight (approx 45 mins £190). Ive pretty much discounted a ppl due to the expense and although I'd love to be an airline pilot I also have to realistic that my age is against me.
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By TLRippon
#1728536
Jazzer wrote:I'm going to book a trial Eurostar flight (90 mins £199) and a trial glider flight (approx 45 mins £190). Ive pretty much discounted a ppl due to the expense and although I'd love to be an airline pilot I also have to realistic that my age is against me.

If it’s a cost issue, why not look into an LAPL it is significantly less expensive to achieve than a PPL and gives you more options than a UK restricted licence.
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By JAFO
#1728544
A LAPL is significantly less expensive to achieve than a PPL if you achieve it in close to the minimum hours and discount the extra 10 hours required before you can fly passengers - which is what a large proportion of people want to do after achieving their licence.
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By Flyin'Dutch'
#1728562
A LAPL medical is also less costly than a Class 2.

The vast majority of private pilots can do the vast majority of the time all the flying they want to do with a LAPL.
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By JAFO
#1728615
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:A LAPL medical is also less costly than a Class 2.

The vast majority of private pilots can do the vast majority of the time all the flying they want to do with a LAPL.


I absolutely agree FD and if I was starting out now I would probably go for the LAPL precisely for those two reasons. It's just that I think that those suggesting to student pilots that the LAPL is necessarily significantly less expensive to train for up to the point where you can take family and friends flying - which is what most private pilots see as a big milestone and an enjoyable part of their hobby - are being more than a little disingenuous or at least not painting the full picture.
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By Flyin'Dutch'
#1728628
Very much depends on the price difference between the hourly rate with an instructor and what you can get your hands on for the post LAPL issue 10 hours.

The medical is cheaper by at least the cost of the ECG and much more if you are fit and get your GP to issue (in general)
By Crash one
#1728648
I get the feeling that the NPPL is considered to be only a microlight licence.
For the avoidance of doubt, it’s not.
It’s very similar to a LAPL.
I’ve been flying my own annex 2 permit aircraft on a NPPL (ssea) with a self dec med for the last 11years.
I’ve never needed an instrument rating or night rating for normal UK flying.
As for the post issue 10 hours before carrying passengers. That didn’t apply to the NPPL 10years ago but may have changed since?
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By Paul_Sengupta
#1728655
Crash one wrote:As for the post issue 10 hours before carrying passengers. That didn’t apply to the NPPL 10years ago but may have changed since?


Someone suggested getting an NPPL on the back of the LAPL then you could use the NPPL to take passengers.

Not sure there's a prescribed route from LAPL to NPPL but I don't see why the CAA shouldn't allow it.
By Crash one
#1728671
When us NPPL holders were being threatened with not allowed to fly EASA aircraft, a number had a panic attack and “up” graded to the LAPL. I don’t recall a route the other way (down grade?)