Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

Moderator: AndyR

User avatar
By Rob P
#1894792
abiopete wrote:I didn't realise the shoulder harness was optional to be honest, that will be a massive help


Before you get too excited I'd read the AAIB of the guy with the Aerobat who thought they were optional and now is incapable of thought at all, or breathing.

https://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports/aaib-in ... bat-g-ciir

Rob P
JAFO, Milty, townleyc and 2 others liked this
By Cessna571
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895086
Rob P wrote:
abiopete wrote:I didn't realise the shoulder harness was optional to be honest, that will be a massive help


Before you get too excited I'd read the AAIB of the guy with the Aerobat who thought they were optional and now is incapable of thought at all, or breathing.

https://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports/aaib-in ... bat-g-ciir

Rob P


My FI didn’t even bother tightening his lap strap all through my course.

He was first on scene (only person for quite a while) at a fatal take off accident at a grass strip.

The next time I flew with him, he spent ages getting it adjusted and tight.

“You ok?”

“Yes, I believe one of the two fatalities would have survived if he’d done this”.

I’ve taken the lap strap more seriously since that.

(I also take my pre take off “quick double check when lined up” seriously, it was pure pilot error)
Rob P, Milty liked this
User avatar
By TLRippon
#1896275
Just a simple leading question, how tall are you?

On a totally unrelated subject: What is the BMI limit CAA medical imposes before asking for CFI fitting in the cockpit certification and a cardiologist report, 34 is or something?

Spoken as a “portly” instructor who swims close to that limit and only has rail thin students when they want to use the 152.
By GAFlyer4Fun
#1896452
lobstaboy wrote:Your eyes skipped over the phrase 'air force style'.


Nope, my eyes skipped over the phrase "The World's Foremost Supplier of Military, Tactical, Outdoor Clothing and Gear."
Also "Combat tested since 1953" below the shop logo.
:wink:
Someone could think its the real thing.

What's the difference between air force style, air ambulance pilot style, ..... ?
Does one have a pocket for a gun and the other have a pocket for a tablet (SkyDemon flavour :lol: )? :wink:

oh and which air force?
#1896511
GAFlyer4Fun wrote:
lobstaboy wrote:Your eyes skipped over the phrase 'air force style'.


Nope, my eyes skipped over the phrase "The World's Foremost Supplier of Military, Tactical, Outdoor Clothing and Gear."
Also "Combat tested since 1953" below the shop logo.
:wink:
Someone could think its the real thing.

What's the difference between air force style, air ambulance pilot style, ..... ?
Does one have a pocket for a gun and the other have a pocket for a tablet (SkyDemon flavour :lol: )? :wink:

oh and which air force?


Just like they use "E6B" for flight computer, the Yanks are fond of re-using military part numbers for all sorts of things. The standard US military flight suit is the CWU-27/P (doesn't that just trip off the tongue), which are available from all over the place.

I particularly rate a company called Gibson-Barnes: I've used their US pattern flight suits for work and, frankly, they're nicer to wear than the much vaunted UK military ones.

Whoever you buy it from, make sure it's Nomex or equivalent, not polycotton, which isn't flame retardant - rather defeating the point of a one-piece flight suit. The 27/P part number is a bit of a clue.

Similarly, lots of people are supplying MA-1, A-2, G-1, etc. flying jackets. They're all "legit" US military specs, but from multiple suppliers.

Phrases like "paramedic style" means some divergence from the strict US military spec. Many reasons you might want to do that - perhaps paramedics don't want leg pockets, or do want two-colour suits, for example.

G