Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

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By Milty
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895619
I'm sticking with Windy and the BBC - both forecasting sunny spells on Friday morning with 6kts from the SW at 9am and cloud at 24k. Got to be back by 12 though before Glos has 300 cloud base. If we can just lock that in now... Before anyone pounces on this, I'm well aware that I'd be as well to ask Mystic Meg for her forecast too but it's good to have something to cling to...
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By TopCat
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895645
T6Harvard wrote:I know it's too far in advance but forecast for the airfield on Monday is 290 16G31. So potentially15kts xw on RWY 26 (I think :( )

'G31' nearly a week in advance, that's hilarious :lol:

People get very exercised over the crosswind, which, understandably is a big scary thing for new students. The only relevance of the crosswind is how much there is of it in the very last few seconds before you straighten it up and touch down.

There was lots more of it at circuit height, and on final, but so what - it just means pointing a bit more into wind as you fly round the circuit, including on final if you're using the crab technique. Or a bit more rudder and wing down if you don't.

Usually, in those last few seconds, the actual crosswind at touchdown height is very much less, as the ground itself slows the wind down considerably. Where they actually measure the windspeed is usually quite a few feet off the ground, as the anemometer will be mounted quite high up, so it's invariably an overestimate.

The only real question is, are you able to control it in those last few seconds? If so, all good: touch down and continue flying it until you're at taxy speed.

If not, go around. Chances are it'll be less next time round. You're just as likely to catch a lull as a gust.

Some days, of course, it's howling a gale and the windsock is horizontal and at 90 degrees to the runway. They're the best days of all as most people stay on the ground and you get the sky and the circuit to yourself.

Hopefully you'll come to enjoy those days, but all in good time :)
Last edited by TopCat on Tue Jan 25, 2022 6:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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By T6Harvard
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895653
I know it'll change but I couldn't resist looking and then estimating the crosswind component for a bit of practice :mrgreen:

@Milty , the NZ Instructors' guidance material has a really good precis, inc the full formula (sine of the angular difference), drawing vector diagrams and, my favourite - estimating!, using the clock face where 30 minutes is half an hour therefore use half the wind speed. #Tim nice but dim :lol:

See https://www.aviation.govt.nz/licensing- ... d-circuit/
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By lobstaboy
#1895683
T6Harvard wrote:..my favourite - estimating!, using the clock face where 30 minutes is half an hour therefore use half the wind speed. #Tim nice but dim :lol:

See https://www.aviation.govt.nz/licensing- ... d-circuit/


This clock face method is what to use in the real world. It's good enough for thinking about cross winds. And it's simple!!!
It's also what to use (again in the real world, not exams) for estimating drift when navigating by the maximum drift angle method - no need for the whizz wheel and simple enough to use while flying. I've banged on about maximum drift angle before, but I can't understand why people don't use it.
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By Milty
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895686
@TopCat I still fondly recall my big crosswind lesson a few months back - certainly made me feel alive and whilst challenging, was a very good experience. It followed a week of very calm landings where I was frankly a bit carp because I think I wasn’t forced to focus and concentrate. A bit of crosswind makes it interesting.

@T6Harvard now you’ve added random words to random numbers :shock: :lol:
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By TopCat
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895704
T6Harvard wrote:I couldn't resist looking and then estimating the crosswind component for a bit of practice

It's only worth finding out what it was after you've landed in it, not before, and then, only for bragging rights.

The numbers will only scare you pointlessly, and what use is the number if you have no idea what it feels like to land in that wind?

The fact is, once you know how high you are in those last few inches, you'll know when to straighten it up, and crosswind landings will lose their scare factor.

To be fair, it does take a while before those last few inches happen so slowly that you can really notice what's happening. So don't beat yourself up if it doesn't come immediately.
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By T6Harvard
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895721
@Paul_Sengupta , seeing the tailwheel, nose-extremely-high version was a surprise to me :shock: although I did have enough wits to think STOL as I watched it line up :D
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By T6Harvard
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895722
@Rob P , thanks for the pointer to the app.

@TopCat , rightly or wrongly I'm not scared of it, I was just imaging another weather cancellation :(
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By tr7v8
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895749
Rob P wrote:Or just use a crosswind calculator app on your phone?

https://play.google.com/store/apps/deta ... roid&gl=GB

Rob P

I was suggested this one on my 1 2 1 Nav training.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/deta ... wind&gl=GB
and Aeroweather for the Met bit. even has a TAF/METAR translator!
https://play.google.com/store/apps/deta ... ther&gl=GB
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By Rob P
FLYER Club Member  FLYER Club Member
#1895763
Yes, that looks pretty much the same.

Rob P
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