Learning to fly, or thinking of learning? Post your questions, comments and experiences here

Moderator: AndyR

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By Irv Lee
#1783817
Train your eyeball and brain at home. Take an air chart (and maybe a beer or glass of wine), think of any two places that might appear on how you folded it, no need to be airfields. So m4/a34 junction and Marlborough. Eyeball it. Make a guess of distance and track. By guess, you could know how much your bent thumb (knuckle to tip) measures in n on the chart... but keep your nails trimmed!. For track you could mentally compare it to a nearby vor compass rose (mag variation being v small here) or lat/long lines on chart. Write down your answer then measure both and write down real answer*. You will gradually become good at accuracy. This eyeballing skill will be useful for both diversions and as a safety net on realising you make a silly mistake measuring properly before a flight.
*Ps: I forgot to say "then pick 2 more places and repeat"!
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By Nero
#1783965
MattL wrote:Schools should be well past that approach to be honest


A past instructor mentioned they didn't allow it but he's since left and time has passed so I will have to ask that specific question around whether they allow any moving map use during training or exercises such as Cross Country

Though I will of course actively engage in learning the old methods for multiple redundancies, I agree it doesn't make sense given how useful it is, and how much I'd be using it post-qualification
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By Irv Lee
#1783991
Three things only instructors know:
If a student is depending on one incredibly obvious feature (eg a power station) coming up to know where they are rather than having a few tools in the box, whatever it is will be on the right, 1 o'clock low. Therefore only the instructor will see it.
If the student starts a sentence with "that must be" then if there is a full stop after the place name instead of a clause beginning "because" then it won't be the named place.
If the the student starts a sentence with "that cannot be" then if there is a full stop after the place name instead of a clause beginning "because" then it will be the named place.
Those three things are why instructors find navigation easy
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By Nero
#1784004
Irv Lee wrote:If a student is depending on one incredibly obvious feature (eg a power station) coming up to know where they


Haha that's usually the case as I'm normally heading towards Lydd and the power station can be seen for miles

Irv Lee wrote: instead of a clause beginning "because" then it won't be the named place.


That's a really useful tip for me to look like I know what I'm doing. I'll definitely be adding qualifiers to my locations from now on. Thanks for that
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By Miscellaneous
#1784007
Nero wrote:
Irv Lee wrote:Train your eyeball and brain at home.


Thanks for the tip, I will try this very soon

But leave the beer and wine at home. Wouldn't go down too well to suggest it helps with your reading of the chart. :wink:
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By skydriller
#1784140
Paul_Sengupta wrote:I tried the thumb thing, but the chart on the tablet keeps moving when I place my thumb on it...

Luckily the chart on my tablet has a scale on it in one corner and a projected distance or time line ahead of the aeroplane position icon, making knuckle use redundant...
8)
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By JAFO
#1784145
Nero wrote:There's a crease on my thumb knuckle that is exactly 10nm from the tip. That's handy


That's one heck of a thumb you've got there. Or did you lose part of the thumb in an accident 10 miles away? :D
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By Nero
#1784378
Well that was a lot better.

Took all your advice on board and was able to plan a flight, stick to a heading, make corrections, identify towns with some big picture viewing and generally a much better time knowing where I was!

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