Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
By Naomi
#1809301
David Wood wrote:
WelshRichy wrote:I start off nice and neat


I don't even get that far with my white-boarding. My handwriting is famously illegible (even to me :lol: ); my spelling largely random and often somewhat individual; and my diagrams are so child-like as to be embarrasing. It's PPT for me every time!

I'm also just starting out and my handwriting is atrocious so I'm leaning more to PPT. Looking for some PPT examples though so I can tweak them to my own teaching style.
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By WelshRichy
#1809310
David Wood wrote:I don't even get that far with my white-boarding. My handwriting is famously illegible (even to me :lol: ); my spelling largely random and often somewhat individual; and my diagrams are so child-like as to be embarrasing. It's PPT for me every time!


Yup I'd go for that too, I sometimes go back to my own handwriting to try and decipher what I had written especially towards the end of whatever it was I was writing. Drawings, well I have to stick to stick men (people?) and stick aeroplanes. My mountains are triangles. Never did win any awards at art but that is not what I'll be training to do and I hope I can get by with this level of artistic flair! :lol:

PowerPoint may be the way to go and am getting better at using its fancy features having to use it more at work over the past number of months but at the end of the day I think I would like to know I can do it the old fashioned way as a white board and running-out pens may be the only facility available to me at the time.

From what I've read, plenty of practice will be had on the course itself!
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By David Wood
#1809314
Naomi wrote:
I'm also just starting out and my handwriting is atrocious so I'm leaning more to PPT. Looking for some PPT examples though so I can tweak them to my own teaching style.


If you end up writing your own (and there's a lot to be said for that. Remember, you never really understand something until you have to Teach it) then my advice would be 'less is more'. Mine were (and some still are) much too wordy. When I review them from time to time and re-edit them I find that, apart from adding in references to develpments in technology which impacts mainly the IRR sets, I'm usually taking stuff out...

Less is More.
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By Naomi
#1809349
The Campbell Flight Instructors Manual is my new bible and it is a lot. I've got my CPL but every time I prepare briefs for my FI classes I realize how much I do not know! Dumbing it down for a fresh SPL is what I am struggling with.
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By lobstaboy
#1809352
The trouble with PowerPoint is it's inflexibility. You end up using it as a prop, and it constrains the briefing to cover what it's got in it and not much else.
Much better to use whiteboard and pens - that way you can be dynamic, interesting and adaptive to the needs and learning style of individual students.

Anyone who has sat through hours of corporate training/communication sessions will know what a switch off PowerPoint can be. Your students need better than that.
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By QSD
#1809366
lobstaboy wrote:The trouble with PowerPoint is it's inflexibility. You end up using it as a prop, and it constrains the briefing to cover what it's got in it and not much else.
Much better to use whiteboard and pens - that way you can be dynamic, interesting and adaptive to the needs and learning style of individual students.

Anyone who has sat through hours of corporate training/communication sessions will know what a switch off PowerPoint can be. Your students need better than that.

I have lived through many death by PowerPoint corporate presentations in my time, but I’ve also seen many really bad whiteboard briefs where the instructor merely writes standard stuff on a board tediously slowly. Often the instructor doesn’t have enough time and skimps (or just forgets) important detail.

PowerPoints are just the bones of the brief. If used well, they take the drudgery and wasted time out of the process. The instructor needs to make the briefing process interactive and dynamic and use the whiteboard in conjunction with the PowerPoints when appropriate.
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By lobstaboy
#1809368
"If used well..."
Yes indeed, and I agree that the Holy Grail would be a mix of the two. But too often PowerPoint is simply an invitation to be lazy. As evidenced by requests to copy other peoples' ...
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By TLRippon
#1809406
I've spent lockdown(2) working on Power pointing all my exercise briefs. It certainly has been a great revision experience. I would recommend doing your own from scratch. I find its the best way to absorb facts and processes.
It does take forever though, been at it for two weeks on and off and only at EX9.
By ArrowStraight
#1809457
In order to comply with our initial DTO statement we use Pooleys. This suits me as I've used them for years anyway and the audit is around the corner. Each page on a large screen monitor. When needed we can call up pictures of instruments , aircraft or what have you. The odd bits that I disagree with are discussed as we go. We have a second large screen in another room, plus two copies in A3 size that allows 4 instructors to give long briefings at the same time, although that rarely happens as we're not a huge club. White boards scattered everywhere for deeper explanations and short briefs.

However, I do get to choose 100% cotton Fruit of the Loom.