Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By Moose Malloy
#809310
lobstaboy wrote:I've been inside the shed that is now used by the film people (used to be owned by my employer). Like many large things the sense of size varies depending where you are. From a distance they look big, but hard to tell how big. From outside close up they don't look so big after all (nothing to judge scale against). From inside it is clear they are RUDDY ENORMOUS. Mock up five storey multi-storey carpark was built in one corner and you could hardly notice it.


Are you sure that's a mock-up? I don't know if they still use it, but Cardington used to house the Building Research Establishment's large building test facility. They used to build large buildings inside and set them on fire and blow them up, which might explain the danger area. Fun job, I would think (Maybe the BRE is your employer?)
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By harry remmington
#809326
Fraid they are called hangers and not sheds.....
Cardingham is a dolls house compared to this:

On a former Soviet military airfield in Brand, just south of Berlin, the CargoLifter hangar has the distinction of being the world's largest single span structure. Eight football pitches could be accommodated in its Brobdingnagian interior and the Eiffel Tower easily stored on its side. At 363m long, 225m wide and 107m high it dwarfs the Goodyear Airdock hitherto thought to be the world's largest airship hangar. (Built in 1929 in Akron, Ohio, Goodyear was 358m x 99m and a mere 34m high.) Designed by SIAT architects and engineered by Arup, CargoLifter looms over its flat site, its translucent membrane skin stretched taut over an arched steel structure. Huge segmented clamshell' doors at each end take I5 minutes to open or close.
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By harry remmington
#809337
Shed
"place of retreat" is a "male necessity" which provides men with solace, especially during their retirement.
:lol:
#1654531
G-BLEW wrote:
Impressed you remembered a thread from nine years ago, I struggle with nine days!

Ian


Your search facility is better than you give it credit for!

Both nice and a little sad to see names from the past.

Rob P
johnm liked this
#1654546
harry remmington wrote:On a former Soviet military airfield in Brand, just south of Berlin, the CargoLifter hangar has the distinction of being the world's largest single span structure. Eight football pitches could be accommodated in its Brobdingnagian interior and the Eiffel Tower easily stored on its side. At 363m long, 225m wide and 107m high it dwarfs the Goodyear Airdock hitherto thought to be the world's largest airship hangar..


Now a holiday resort/leisure park:
Image
GeorgeJLA liked this
#1654549
skydriller wrote:
harry remmington wrote:On a former Soviet military airfield in Brand, just south of Berlin, the CargoLifter hangar has the distinction of being the world's largest single span structure. Eight football pitches could be accommodated in its Brobdingnagian interior and the Eiffel Tower easily stored on its side. At 363m long, 225m wide and 107m high it dwarfs the Goodyear Airdock hitherto thought to be the world's largest airship hangar..


Now a holiday resort/leisure park:
Image


and approximately 32,731 London double-decker buses :D
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By Sooty25
#1654555
Lowtimer wrote:
As the sheds are listed buildings, they can't be knocked down. They are very tatty though and I would not be surprised if they, sort of, fell down under their own steam. Such thngs have been known to happen to listed building sof little commercial value and with massively unaffordable repair costs associated with them.


my family owned a semi derelict commercial premises a few decades ago, and the local authority had it listed without informing us. If I'd have known the grief and expense it was then going to cause, I would have stolen a bulldozer and flattened it the day the papers arrived.
By Cessna57
#1654557
Sooty25 wrote:
Lowtimer wrote:
As the sheds are listed buildings, they can't be knocked down. They are very tatty though and I would not be surprised if they, sort of, fell down under their own steam. Such thngs have been known to happen to listed building sof little commercial value and with massively unaffordable repair costs associated with them.


my family owned a semi derelict commercial premises a few decades ago, and the local authority had it listed without informing us. If I'd have known the grief and expense it was then going to cause, I would have stolen a bulldozer and flattened it the day the papers arrived.


The listed buildings in Enfield went through a phase of suddenly catching fire.

Then flats were subsequently built on the land where they once stood.

Must have been youths :roll: