Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1852765
Trust me ! This is not the reply of some sad old saddo. Unless you can find a friend who might coincidentally be a pilot, you'll spend an awful amount of time in the cockpit on your own.

Flying is a highly specialised business attracting only a minority due, among other things to the perception of risk which is, today, a significant element.
#1852767
Trust me ! This is not the reply of some sad old saddo. Unless you can find a friend who might coincidentally be a pilot, you'll spend an awful amount of time in the cockpit on your own.

Flying is a highly specialised business attracting only a minority due, among other things, to an unrealistic perception of risk which is, today, a significant element.
#1852815
For fixed-wing flying in the UK, you’re pretty limited on landing somewhere your spouse would deem “nice” without a lengthy transit on the other end. Maybe:

• Isles of Scilly
• Scotland (in the Summer)
• Dublin
• Le Touquet, France

Without flying a helicopter, you’re limited to the UK selection of aerodromes with Goodwood, Sywell and Turweston probably being the best – but honestly none of them anything special. By nature grass strips are in the middle of nowhere. Some aerodromes that get “talked up” here will probably be of little interest to your wife/children. Example: Sandown is loved by this group, but I don’t really like it and wouldn’t take my wife or children back (though admit the owner seems to be putting in much effort - but it’s not really my type of place/people).

As for the posts above of “I’ve got no friends” and “everyone is scared of flying”, their views are not necessarily true for all. In 15 years flying, I can probably count on my fingers how many times I’ve flown with another pilot. As for children, I’ve taken dozens of my son’s friends flying over the years. Only once did a parent decline (a school friend’s parents who again were not exactly “my people”). I’ve actually found it quite the opposite as from age 4yrs or 5yrs, the parents have been surprisingly open to flying. You mention teenagers; I took my oldest son and two friends to their away rugby game just in the past few weeks (negating 5hrs of driving).
#1852836
You can never tell who will like flying and who will hate it. My brother, Aston driving, sportsbike riding, ex schoolboy scrambler (not risk averse) , dislikes light aircraft. But will go in one if he has to. My disabled MiL cannot wait to get in and go round in circles. A horsey, veggie, social worker neighbour (yes, really) was fascinated and loved her “stick time” in a C150. Dad, who encouraged me to fly, was terrified on his first flight with me - held onto the seat base with both hands the whole time. Just get them in and encourage anyone who shows an interest!
T6Harvard, AndyR, Flyin'Dutch' and 2 others liked this
#1852842
flyingearly wrote:I'm sure that everyone on here has been in my situation before, so I'm looking for recommendations and guidance.

The situation: my OH has been up flying with me once in the 18 months or so since I got my licence; my kids a few times. They all liked it, I think: my son keeps asking to go flying, whereas my daughter is more interested in playing Minecraft.

I have now (excitedly) got a share in something slightly better equipped, slightly faster, with slightly better range. More importantly, I've got something I part-own that means I can now go (relatively) where I like, whenever I like - and I intend to take advantage.



Get a Mistress, say it is your fly buddy and as Flash said - take her to heaven and back 5 times a day - Wuff Wuff.

Or just do as we all do and say we are polishing our rocket and go for the £100 hamburger :mrgreen:
mick w, townleyc, skydriller liked this
#1852848
Loco parentis wrote:Trust me ! This is not the reply of some sad old saddo. Unless you can find a friend who might coincidentally be a pilot, you'll spend an awful amount of time in the cockpit on your own.

Flying is a highly specialised business attracting only a minority due, among other things, to an unrealistic perception of risk which is, today, a significant element.


Echo?

:D :D

KE
#1852855
RisePilot wrote:Example: Sandown is loved by this group, but I don’t really like it and wouldn’t take my wife or children back (though admit the owner seems to be putting in much effort - but it’s not really my type of place/people).


You don't have to stay on the airfield. The Sandown/Shanklin seafront is a great place for the family. Beach, ice-cream, pier, restaurants and pubs, "Kiss me quick" hats, what more could you want?

Trent772 wrote:Get a Mistress


Tell your wife you're with your mistress, tell your mistress you're with your wife, and then go flying in peace.
Rob P, tomtytom, Trent772 and 1 others liked this
#1852871
Morten wrote: Old Warden if they liked Duxford.


Both are destination for the aeroplane enthusiast, but Shuttleworth has a country house and gardens to wander around for those that are not aviation minded...

Regards, SD..
#1852878
If you have friends/relatives a distance away pick a bank holiday then fly to visit them, I am North of Liverpool with family in Hampshire, a bank holiday Monday took me about 2 hours instead of 6+ including drive to the airfield and pick up the other end, fantastic sitting in the RV7 looking at the traffic jams on the Motorways!
(Do check the weather in advance though - nothing worse than promising this then failing because it is pouring with rain!)
T6Harvard liked this
#1852880
Thanks all for replies. I had my first session of familiarisation time yesterday so will be having another slot or two before I'm let loose - I'll probably visit a few of these places solo first to check things out before inviting family along.

My main aim for this year is 4th July to take my son away flying/camping somewhere, weather permitting (for both the flying and camping), although I fear I've probably left it too late for booking! Duxford is a good shout for the kids - they always like it there and I can justify flying there based on the queue for the Dartford tunnel alone.
T6Harvard liked this
#1852891
The worst thing you can do, for the first few times, is to fly somewhere on a preplanned day, further away, plan to stay overnight camp and need to have good weather the next day to fly back as well.

ISTR from other posts (but may be mistaken) that you have not had your licence for long, the aeroplane is newish to you, and that you would like flying with your family to be a success.

Most new experiences go best if you go from the known gradually into the unknown step by step.

A cautious approach over some time is usually also appreciated by non-flying family members, especially mums.
T6Harvard, patowalker liked this