Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1841691
Hooligan wrote:All the Irish, Indian and other two seater Spitfires were modified by Vickers...
.

You have missed out the rumoured Russian-converted two-seaters.

Thanks for PT462. I'd never have got there. I was thinking PV202 but had my doubts so stayed quiet. :thumleft:

Rob P
#1841731
Ah yes the UTIs, Comrade! I think the Nuh Zuhland two seater might have the Grace canopy too. Thinking back, PV202 did have the Grace modification when she was originally restored but it was cited as a contributory cause in the sad accident at Goodwood as I recall. The raised hood on the Vickers mod gives the instructor a much better view. To be honest, I like the raised hood.

Most of them have had gear undercarriage related prangs at one time or another for some reason...

Edit: PS, just washed my anorak! :D
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#1841761
I like most of the stuff he does. I thought this was a good mix of flying and background for the uninitiated.

I think it would be really good if they did a “Guy Martin Extra” type programme where they cut all of the history and false jeopardy voice over. And add in much more of the flying bits. I bet they would get just as many viewers for that programme on top of the mainstream version.
#1842252
leiafee wrote:It was all very Boys Own self congratulatory fluff, and the narrator needed a throat sweet, but the UH bits were a lot of fun.

That and the wobbly wingovers which was one of the few areas you got a sense of the learning curve.


But Guy Martin has learnt to fly in 2 hours or so..... hasn't he??
MrT6 is now asking what I have really been doing 'at the airfield' when I told him I was going for my 9th lesson, 'cos obviously I'm either fibbing or thick, or possibly both :lol: :lol:
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#1842287
AeroDyn wrote:It's prob99 they deliberately let the scope on the rifle cut his brow. It is SO well known than any competent trainer should mention it


The way I saw that unfold is that he was indeed told, but didnt listen and paid the price?
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#1842302
T6Harvard wrote:
leiafee wrote:It was all very Boys Own self congratulatory fluff, and the narrator needed a throat sweet, but the UH bits were a lot of fun.

That and the wobbly wingovers which was one of the few areas you got a sense of the learning curve.


But Guy Martin has learnt to fly in 2 hours or so..... hasn't he??
MrT6 is now asking what I have really been doing 'at the airfield' when I told him I was going for my 9th lesson, 'cos obviously I'm either fibbing or thick, or possibly both :lol: :lol:


According to next week Radio Times he made some remark about “not bothered to fly just for the sake of it”.
Yes he managed to pole it around the sky (both hands on the stick, no throttle control) which is completely wrong and why didn’t the instructor point that out? My daughter did that the first time she flew with me (one handed).
Yes he got the Tiger on the ground, once.
He hasn’t learned to fly in two hours.
Although he’s paying tribute to those that did it in WW2, it’s a very false version of the real training and will certainly mislead anyone watching it.
It looks like a box ticking exercise for TV.
I’d like to be proved wrong , we’ll see on Sunday.
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#1842307
By an amazing coincidence my first experience flight was in the very Harvard GM was in. I was given a short safety briefing, a quick introduction to the instruments and controls, and after take off, at a safe height, I was given some demos and instruction.

I had never sat at any ac controls before but it never crossed my mind to do anything other than one hand on the stick - it did make me wince seeing the pudding stirring :shock:
#1842322
skydriller wrote:
AeroDyn wrote:It's prob99 they deliberately let the scope on the rifle cut his brow. It is SO well known than any competent trainer should mention it


The way I saw that unfold is that he was indeed told, but didnt listen and paid the price?


Trainer obviously knew that was going to happen, and I reckon should have corrected him again.
:eye:
.... or get him to shoot again but left handed to see if learned lesson or got a matching cut.
:clown:
#1842343
I shot the 303 Enfield in the ATC in the 50s and Navy in 60s and there was never a scope sight fitted.
I’ve got an air rifle with a scope on it and the “eye relief” distance from scope to face, is 3inches.
So that was just a pantomime for TV. Lucky he didn’t do more damage! What did they call it, Snipers brow? What rubbish.
#1842355
Crash one wrote:I shot the 303 Enfield in the ATC in the 50s and Navy in 60s and there was never a scope sight fitted.
I’ve got an air rifle with a scope on it and the “eye relief” distance from scope to face, is 3inches.
So that was just a pantomime for TV. Lucky he didn’t do more damage! What did they call it, Snipers brow? What rubbish.


I remember firing the Lee Enfield at a range when I was a young Air Cadet. If the instructor saw we weren't holding the rifle butt tightly enough into the shoulder to deal with the recoil, they made us fire it standing up.... A true demonstration of the power of the recoil
#1842356
I spent some time with Guy at a Ford Day at Silverstone.

The impression I got from a half hour meeting or so was that he was a very genuine chap, a little baffled that people where happy to pay him lots of money and supply lots of kit (Ford) for stuff he would have been doing at his own expense anyway.

I doubt he has much input into the finished programme, nor does he really care as long as people keep giving him lots of money he can plough back into the things he loves doing..

Rob P
#1842367
Crash one wrote:Is it impossible to to do the same, at least to solo, in a Tiger moth? Or are they so precious as to be too risky.


I went from ab-initio to PPL that way with the Cambrideg Flying Group ('twas a while ago now, but they're still doing it as is Tiger Moth Training at Henstridge}.

Much more fun than a PA28, in my opinion anyhow. You'll certainly learn what the rudder pedals are for and how to finess a three point landing. Highly recommended.

FWIW I rather like Guy Martin's genuine (it seems to me) humility and unfailing optimism. The programme obviously has a 'formula' but he's always watchable.
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