Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1841155
In North America there’s no QFE and so circuit heights are all QNH on the “altimmitter” setting.
It might be a good idea to be used to adding the field elevation when no QFE is available, and flying QNH.
Just remember the “high to low, look below” phrase.

If you are going to do your own QFE, write down the QNH first, then write the QFE you calculate, review it for correctness, and then adjust the altimeter.
Better still, ask other traffic on the frequency what they are using.
Any time you adjust something there is room for error.
Keeping it as simple as possible reduces the amount of possible error.

There’s no answer to the problem using the wrong call sign.
It’s common for people used to flying one aircraft all the time, and for those who do not always fly an aircraft on the same registry.

The most common error I have observed has been when the pilot I’m flying with starts by calling “Air Canada.....”, hang on a minute, this is a Citabria.

Expect errors, we all make them.
My error was turning the volume down on box 2 while I listened to the ATIS on box one.
I went back onto box two and listened, made my call, and then realised what I had done.

I was a little high on my flapless approach, ‘had to apply flaps... This was a reaction to undershooting on a glide approach into Blackbushe in November, and having to apply a little power. But the Warrior glides better than the Cessna 152.
Of course the second flapless glide approach was perfect, but it did mean doing four landings rather than three.

Do not expect to do everything perfectly on every flight you make. The important thing is to be able to spot and correct your errors.

Do expect to make errors when flying dual.
Regardless of however good you are, an instructor is a distraction and any distraction is a source of error.

An instructor in the teaching mode is different to an instructor in the assessing mode.
When I’m having a check out I am also an ‘assessing instructor’ however experienced the person checking me out might be.
It was my job to assess instructors! Old habits do not die, but I make my comments constructive and kind rather than nasty criticism.
But it is always good when I learn something new, and there’s usually something to learn.

The clear evidence of “distraction” is shown when a student goes solo.
Most often the student is surprised at how well their flight went... But their attention is heightened due to being on their own for the first time, and there’s no distraction in the other seat.

I am not saying that a dual check is not a good thing, it’s essential in many cases.
But that you should not have expectations other than being a little more inept than you usually are.
Be prepared to forgive yourself, and continue to pay attention to the ongoing flight.

Avoid finishing on a bad landing... If you screw up, go around, do it better next time, and consider the landing fee afterwards.
That first glide approach cost me £12... (the landing was good but I had to use the flaps).

Most important is assessing your flying after becoming comfortable again... That’s when complacency might be a problem.
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#1841174
Over 6 months since my last flight.

- Called Southend "Stansted" when making use of their circuit offer!
- Didn't fully correct some sideways drift on touchdown.
- The suction cup attaching my PilotAware to the back window gave up and I started getting GPS drop outs as it was now rolling about on the back seat!
- Parked up and realised I'd left carb heat on.

Wonderful to be up again, but certainly took a little while to feel like I was getting in front of the aircraft again. As others have said, the muscle memory wasn't too bad but everything took a lot more conscious brain power!

And now another few weeks layoff as the aircraft is in for annual! :roll:

Cheers,
Tim
PS. Recommend recording your flight to review afterwards as long as it's not a distraction - only realised my RT error on review and spotted some other minor things to work on as well.
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By Rob P
#1841200
I once contacted RAF Cranwell and in a momentary brain fade called them Cranfield - there used to be an airfield so named ;)

To say they didn't sound amused is an understatement.
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#1841320
I had to abort my second takeoff, when the engine momentarily cut as I pushed the throttle in. I was surprised how long it took to decide that it would be sensible to stop and retire to the runup area for some more extended power checks. There were a good couple of seconds of internal debate as to whether to be an idiot or not.
Rob P, T6Harvard liked this
By t1m80
#1841328
Took an hour with an instructor as I hadn't flown since July AND was a low-timer anyway having only just got my licence in the February. General handling, steep turns, stalls no problem. PFLS showed a rusty tint but got comfortable quickly. Radio was fine (which was a surprise), circuits were rubbish (which was an even bigger surprise!!). Felt 'behind' pretty much all the way round. Booked another session next weekend as I'm definitely not back to where I was yet.
AlanM, Rob P, JAFO and 1 others liked this
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By leiafee
#1841352
matthew_w100 wrote:I had to abort my second takeoff, when the engine momentarily cut as I pushed the throttle in. I was surprised how long it took to decide that it would be sensible to stop and retire to the runup area for some more extended power checks. There were a good couple of seconds of internal debate as to whether to be an idiot or not.


Brains are weird like that!
#1841567
Rob P wrote:Whilst I would never claim skygod status I don't find winding (say) 190ft off the altimeter hugely distracting.


Try 800 odd down the West Country, when being bounced around like in a washing machine!

MichaelP wrote:If you are going to do your own QFE, write down the QNH first, then write the QFE you calculate, review it for correctness, and then adjust the altimeter.


If you have an AFE guide, the number of mb (hPa) to wind off is displayed below the airfield elevation.

Image
T6Harvard liked this
#1841594
TopCat wrote:Just out of interest, how long is it since people have flown? Have some gone many months?


19th September last year for me when I had an enjoyable afternoon flight down to Blackpool and return. Glorious weather, could see as far as the eye could see with not a cloud in the sky. Managed to revalidate my SEP last year via standard experience requirements.

We then moved house and soon after the aeroplane went tech. Then lockdown.

Age+1 tomorrow and I have my checkout in the morning, cannot wait and will report deficiencies afterwards. I’ll just blame them on my new A20s as I’ve never used ANR before... will take my DCs with me just in case. :lol:

We have two massive runways at Prestwick so will need to practice some shorter fields at some point before venturing further airfield.
T6Harvard liked this
#1841601
Even though I'd been using ANR for years, when I first bought the A20 it came as a bit of a shock - in a PA28 (rented, in the US) with the engine at idle, I couldn't hear it at all! :shock: Took a few minutes for my brain to adjust.
User avatar
By akg1486
#1841603
I haven't had any long breaks due to Covid, but whenever I don't fly for a month or so it's usually the same things that I forget. In no particular order they are:

- Setting the transponder to ALT on uncontrolled airfields (I mostly fly from a controlled airfield)
- Turning on the landing lights (except when it's dark: then I remember)
- Turning off the landing lights
- Turning off the carb heat on short final (if applicable)
- Noting the departure and arrival times on my piece of paper when on uncontrolled airfields
- Writing down the tacho time before leaving the aircraft

The last two are not only after a break but annoyingly happen all the time. I've lost count of how many times I've had to go back to the hangar to check the tacho time when filling in the log book. I rent from my club, so it's a pretty vital piece of information since the billing is based on tacho. Skydemon is of course a great help with the times. When I take off or land at our (controlled) airfield, the tower gives us the take-off time when leaving the control zone and the landing time when exiting the runway.
#1841604
Paul_Sengupta wrote:Even though I'd been using ANR for years, when I first bought the A20 it came as a bit of a shock - in a PA28 (rented, in the US) with the engine at idle, I couldn't hear it at all! :shock: Took a few minutes for my brain to adjust.


Thanks Paul, I’ll keep this in mind and will spend a bit longer before calling for clearance. They’ve been hyped up by everyone over the past few years, hope I’m not disappointed!

Really looking forward to a lovely summer at the club and flying around.
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By MichaelP
#1841617
- Setting the transponder to ALT on uncontrolled airfields (I mostly fly from a controlled airfield)
- Turning on the landing lights (except when it's dark: then I remember)


“Lights and Action” on line up...

We’re all guilty of this at times.
Annoyance to me was flying with a 777 captain in a new type here in England.
I switched the landing lights on prior to takeoff, and he immediately reached over and switched them off! “We don’t do that here” he said.
I bet he does in the 777 out of Heathrow. It was not a good demonstration of CRM.
Landing lights and strobes reduce the chances of a bird strike, and are habitually turned on in the busy airspace around Vancouver.

Get used to being asked “is your transponder turned on?” or the more abrupt “turn your transponder on”. We all make this mistake once in a while.
User avatar
By akg1486
#1841618
MichaelP wrote:Get used to being asked “is your transponder turned on?” or the more abrupt “turn your transponder on”. We all make this mistake once in a while.

When I take off from an uncontrolled airfield, I usually double-check the transponder before calling any information service. I do occasionally forget it also at our own airfield, in particular when I get the code when starting to taxi: I set the code but leave it in STBY until take-off. Our ATC usually say "Can you confirm transponder 7000?" during climb-out. That's an ever nicer way to put it. :D

I hardly think I'm alone in making these mistakes. That doesn't make it ok, and I strive to not make them. What "my" examples above have in common is that they are related to phases of flying where I don't have the checklist in hand. Things done prior to taxi and during run-up I don't tend to miss regardless the level of rustiness. In fact, being rusty makes you less complacent and less likely to miss things for that reason.
MichaelP, T6Harvard liked this
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